Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
eXterne Wortlisten
WWW - World Wide Words

worldwidewords.org
WWW - World Wide Words
Michael Quinion
about international English from a British viewpoint
The English language - its history, quirks, curiosities and evolution

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/

After 20 years writing about the peculiarities and evolution of the English language, I stopped suddenly and finally early in 2017. Truth be told, after 930 issues of my weekly newsletter I was becoming written out. Every week that passed made writing more of a chore and less of a pleasure. So I shall no longer be sending out newsletters nor adding or updating pages on the site.
...


Erstellt: 2021-03

worldwidewords.org - H
How Words Enter the Language

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/howdowords.htm

...
In the world of today’s lexicography, usage is king. We are, in the language of the business, descriptive dictionary makers: we record, we collate, we analyse, and we describe what people actually say and write. If enough English speakers decide that some word or phrase has value, to the extent that those who encounter it are likely to need to consult the dictionary in search of its meaning, then it is put into new editions. Not always very quickly — there is merit in taking one’s time to build up a picture of usage and so avoid being misled by temporary enthusiasms and short-lived fashion. And if enough speakers decide that a word no longer means what the dictionaries say it means but something else entirely, then we have to note that, too. You may feel that such changes amount to misuse — and certainly terms do change because of ignorance or misunderstandings — but that’s largely irrelevant to the job of the dictionary maker.
...
Some people hate this anarchy so much that there are occasional calls for a body to regulate the language, control what should be in and what out, and to advise users on what is good English and bad. The example of the "Académie Française" is often put in evidence. The Académie attempts to maintain the purity of the French language (for example, by providing lists of French words that are suitable alternatives to the influx of English neologisms, such as replacing "tie-break" with "jeu décisif", "walkman" with "baladeur", or "software" with "logiciel"), but its influence, though great, has not been decisive.

There have been determined attempts to amend the way people use languages: Noah Webster was influential in changing some spellings in the United States after the 1820s; Kemal Atatürk changed Turkish to the Latin script in 1928 and removed many borrowings from other languages; the Singapore government has instituted a Speak Good English session every April to persuade local people to use international English rather than their own patois called "Singlish"; there have recently been spelling changes in both Dutch and German. Making that kind of change requires political will and muscle and is hard even then. Canute had it right — there are some tides which authority is unable easily to resist or control.
...
So, no English Academy, I’m afraid. No huddles of earnest scholars, debating the current crop of neologisms (like "bonkbuster") and marking them with the tick of official acceptance or the cross of oblivion. Just a number of individual dictionary editors, trying to make sense of an inchoate mass of material thrown up by shifts in fashion, personal usage, inventive genius, new technologies, and a dozen other factors. It’s a dirty job, but somebody’s got to do it.

*The OED’s definition of bonkbuster: “A type of popular novel characterized by frequent explicit sexual encounters between the characters. Popularized by the British writer Sue Limb, writing under the pseudonym ‘Dulcie Domum’, in her humorous newspaper column ‘Bad Housekeeping’ (1990-2001)”. The word is from the common British slang "bonk" for “an act of sexual intercourse”, on the model of "blockbuster".


Erstellt: 2021-03

worldwidewords.org - P
Pronunciation Guide

(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/pronguide.htm

This list contains the main sounds of standard British English (the one that’s associated with southern England, also often called Received Pronunciation). The "International Phonetic Alphabet" ("IPA") symbols appear on my Web pages; the text equivalents are for my weekly e-mail newsletters. See the bottom of the page for some important notes.

Consonants

The following letters have their usual values in English:

b, d, f, h, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t, v, w, z.
...


Erstellt: 2021-03

1

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


Misc 2C-B; 360-degree feedback; 3D fatigue.

Erstellt: 2021-03

A

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


A A flea in one’s ear; A rose by any other name; A Word A Day; A Word for All; A Zillion Troubles; Abacot; Abbreviation ‘lb’ for pound; Abditory; Abecedarian; Abigail; Able-whackets; Abracadabra; Absquatulate; According to Cocker; Acersecomic; Acid test; Acoustic shock; Acronychal; Acronyms for Your Enjoyment; Acrophony; Across the board; Action at a distance; Activate the balls!; Activitystat; Adam’s off ox; Addiction; Adimpleate; Adipocere; Adoxography; Adumbrate; Adust; Aeriated; Aerobot; Aerotropolis; Affluence test; AfPak; Aga saga; Agelastic; Agister; Agitory; Agnotology; Agog; Agrestic; Agroterrorism; Ahead of the curve; Ahoy!; Aksed versus asked; Alamagoozlum; Alas Poor Nell; Albertopolis; Alcolock; Alcopop; Alegar and beeregar; Alexipharmic; Aliment; All mouth and trousers; All my eye and Betty Martin; All Sir Garnet; All wool and a yard wide; Allision; Allohistory; All-singing, all-dancing; Altermodernism; Aluminium versus aluminum; Ambient; Ambient advertising; Ambulance at the bottom of the cliff; America In So Many Words; Amn’t; Amperkine; Ampersand; An Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology; Anadiplosis; Analemmatic; Anamorphosis; Anatine; Andrew; Andropause; Anfractuosity; Angiogenesis inhibitor; Animadvert; Anorakish; Ansated; Ansible; Antelucan; Anthropodermic; Anti-fogmatic; Antimacassar; Apocope; Apology; Apoptosis; Aposematic; Aposiopesis; Apostrophes; Apotropaic; Apozem; Apple of one’s eye; Approximeeting; Apricate; April; Arab Spring; Archaeogenetics; Archaeon; Arenaceous; Areologist; Arfanarf; Argosy; Argy-bargy; Aristology; Arms akimbo; Arsenal; Artefact versus artifact; Artilect; As the crow flies; Ascian; Ash; Asian Brown Cloud; Asparagus; Astrobleme; Astrobolism; Asylo; Asymmetrical warfare; Asynartesia; At sixes and sevens; At the drop of a hat; Ataraxy; Atrabilious; Attercop; Aunt Sally; Austerian; Austringer; Autohagiography; Auxetic.

Erstellt: 2021-03

B

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


B Back to square one; Backronym; Bad cess; Bafflegab; Bail out; Balderdash; Balderdash & Piffle; Balderdash and flummery; Bald-faced, boldfaced or barefaced?; Balductum; Balls-up; Ban; Banana; Banausic; Bangalored; Bankrupt; Bant; Banter; Baragouin; Barbarian; Barbecue; Barber’s cat; Barking mad; Barmecide; Barometz; Barrelhouse Words; Basket case; Bat an eyelid; Bated breath; Bathykolpian; Beam me up, Scotty!; Beanpole family; Bear up; Beat; Beat the band; Beck and call; Bedbug; Bedizened; Bee’s knees; Beefing; Beg the question; Begat; Beggar on horseback; Beggar-my-neighbour; Beghilos; Behove and behoove; Bejuggle; Believe you me; Bells and whistles; Bellwether; Benidorm leave; Beside oneself; Besmitten; Bespoke; Best bib and tucker; Between the Lines; Between versus among; Betwixt; Beyond the pale; Bezoar; Big Apple; Big Bang II; Big cheese; Big girl’s blouse; Big pond; Big shot; Bill; Bill of goods; Billy-o; Binge-watching; Bint; Bioart; Bioinformatics; Bioinvasion; Biomimetics; Biomusicology; Biophilia; Biopiracy; Biopunk; Biosimilar; Biosurgery; Birds and the bees; Birtism; Bissextile, Intercalary, Embolistic; Bistro; Bitter end; Black as Newgate knocker; Black Hole; Black Maria; Black swan; Blackbirding; Blackguard; Blackmail; Black-water rafting; Blairism; Blatherskite; Blatteroon; Bless your cotton socks; Blighty; Blind Freddie; Blivet and nitnoid; Blizzard of horseradish; Blobitecture; Blockbuster; Blogger; Bloke; Blood and thunder; Blood minerals; Bloody; Blooming English; Blooper; Blot one’s copy book; Bloviate; Blow the gaff; Blower; Blue; Blue blood; Blue moon; Blue murder; Blue revolution; Bluejacking; Blue-plate special; Bluestocking; Bluetooth; Blu-Ray; Blurb; Bob’s your uncle; Bob’s-a-dying; Bobby; Bodacious; Bodger; Boffin; Bog-standard; Bogus; Bohemian; Boilerplate; Bold as brass; Bombilation; Bonce; Bonzer; Boodle bag; Bookaneer; Bookcrossing; Books without the letter ‘e’; Boondoggle; Boot; Boot and trunk; Boot camp; Bootleg; Bootless; Borborygmus; Boscage; Boss; Bossnapping; Bossy; Botnet; Bottle; Boughten; Bounding main; Bounty hunter; Boustrophedonic; Bowdlerise; Bowser; Box of birds; Boxing Day; Boycott; Bozo; Braggadocious; Brain fingerprinting; Brainstorming; Brand; Brand spanking new; Brass monkey weather; Brass ring; Brass tacks; Brassed off; Brassiere; Brave New Words; Bread-and-butter letter; Break a leg; Break one’s duck; Break-out space; Brexit; Briar pipe; Bribery; Bridegroom; Bridewell; Bridie; Bright; Brimborion; Bringing Home the Bacon; Brobdingnagian; Bromopnea; Broom-squire; Brosiering; Brouhaha; Brown as a berry; Brown study; Brown Windsor soup; Brownie points; Brummagem; Bruxer; Buck up; Buckley’s chance; Budget; Buff; Bug; Bug letter; Bull in a china shop; Bulldozer; Bulls and bears; Bully pulpit; Bumbershoot; Bumf; Bun fight; Bunny rabbit; Burden of one's song; Burgoo; Burke; Business theatre; Busman’s holiday; Bustard; But and ben; Butler; Butter no parsnips; Butter wouldn’t melt in his mouth; Butterfly; Butterscotch; By and large; By hook or by crook; By Jove; By the great horn spoon; By the skin of one’s teeth.

Erstellt: 2021-03

C

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


C C3; Cabal; Cachinnatory; Cack-handed; Cacoethes; Cacography; Cad; Cadastral; Cadge; Café Scientifique; Caffeinol; Cagmag; Cahoot; Caitiff; Calenture; Callipygian; Callithumpian; Caltrop; Camelion; Camera; Camp; Campaign; Can of worms; Cancrine; Candent; Cantankerous; Cantrev; Caparisoned; Capitulate and recapitulate; Captology; Carabidologist; Carbon bubble; Carbon footprint; Carborexia; Card; Cardigan; Career versus careen; Carnage; Carnal; Carpet; Carphology; Carrot and stick; Carrotmobbing; Carry the can; Carwhichet; Carwichet; Cascabel; Case in point; Case the joint; Cash on the nail; Cast aspersions; Cataglottism; Cataract; Catbird seat; Catchpole; Catoptromancy; Caucus; Caught red-handed; Cedar revolution; Cello scrotum; Celtic Tiger; Cenatory; Cento; Centre around; Centrifical force; Ceraunograph; Chad; Chaise longue; Chalazion; Chalk and cheese; Chambers Dictionary of Etymology; Chambers Slang Dictionary; Chance your arm; Charabanc; Charley horse; Charon; Chatoyant; Chav; Cheap at half the price; Cheapskate; Cheat-bread; Cheese it!; Chemical; Chemtrail; Chequered past; Chestnut; Chew the fat; Chew the scenery; Chicanery; Chickens coming home to roost; Chi-ike; Chiliastic; Chill Can; Chillaxing; Chillwave; Chin wag; Chindia; Chip off the old block; Chip on one’s shoulder; Chiptune; Chissicking; Chloephobia; Chock-a-block; Chook; Chops; Chosen Words; Chow; Chrestomathy; Chronogram; Chronopsychology; Chronotherapy; Chthonic; Chuck-farthing; Chucklehead; Chunder; Church key; Cider Insight; Circular; Circumbendibus; Citing Online Sources; Citizen journalism; Claptrap; Claytronics; Clean one’s clock; Cleanskin; Cleft stick; Clerihew; Clicktivism; Cli-fi; Climate velocity; Clinical governance; Clinquant; Clone; Closet versus Cupboard; Cloud nine; Cobblers; Cobot; Cock a snook; Cock and bull story; Cock-a-hoop; Cockaigne; Cockamamie; Cockles of your heart; Cockpit; Cockshut; Cocksure; Cocktail; Cock-up; Codology; Codswallop; Cohobation; Colcannon Night; Cold shoulder; Collaboratory; Collapse of stout party; Collins English Dictionary; Collop; Collyrium; Collywobbles; Colon; Colonel; Colophonian; Colour Me Environmental; Colporteur; Column; Come a cropper; Come hell or high water; Come the old soldier; Comeuppance; Commash; Commentariat; Community currency; Community marriage policy; Compleat v complete; Comprise; Comprise redux; Computer-assisted journalism; Concinnity; Confide; Conformator; Conkerer; Consilience; Contextomy; Contumely; Convivium; Cooked; Cooking one's goose; Cool; Cool Britannia; Coopering; Coopetition; Cooties; Cop; Copacetic; Cop-out; Copper-fastened; Coppice; Co-respondent; Corium; Corpus; Corybantic; Cosmeceutical; Costard; Costus; Cotton on; Coulrophobia; Country names in -stan; Countryside; Coup; Covenant marriage; Coxcomb; Crêpe hanger; Crack shot; Crackerjack; Crackpot; Crap; Cream; Cream crackered; Credible; Crib; Cribellate; Cricket; Crimony; Crimping; Crinkum-crankum; Crisis memoir; Crisitunity; Criticaster; Crizzling; Crocodile tears; Cronyism; Crosspatch; Crowdworking; Cruciverbalist; Crumpet; Crunk; Crush; Cry all the way to the bank; Cub; Cucking-stool; Cucumber time; Cudiles or cudulles; Cull; Culpon; Culprit; Culture; Culture jamming; Cunicular; Cupertino; Curate’s egg; Curmudgeon; Curriculum; Curry favour; Curtain lecture; Cut and dried; Cut the mustard; Cut your stick; Cute as a bug’s ear; Cuts no ice; Cyber Monday; Cyberchondria; Cyberloafing; Cyberplague; Cyberventing; Cyborg; Cymbocephalic; Cynosure.

Erstellt: 2021-03

D

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


D Dab hand; Dactylonomy; Daft-days; Dandiprat; Dangerous; Darby and Joan; Darg; Dark tourism; Darknet; Darwin Day; Dashboard; Data archaeology; Data haven; Datacasting; Dauncy; Davy Jones’ locker; Daylight robbery; Dead as a doornail; Dead cat bounce; Dead reckoning; Deadhead; Dealybob; Dear John letter; Deasil; Death toll; Decadal Dismay; Decimate; Decussate; Deep Web; De-extinction; Defenestrate; Deipnosophist; Dekko; Deleb; Deliquescent; Demitarian; Demutualisation; Denglisch; Denigrate; Dental Spa; Deodand; Depraved and Insulting English; Deprecate; Deray; Derby; Derring-do; Destrier; Devil to pay, the; Devo-max; DFY; Diabesity; Dibs; Dichotomy; Dick’s hatband; Dictionary of American Regional English; Diddler; Different to; Digamy; Digital divide; Digital Radio Mondiale; Digladiation; Digs; Dilemma; Dingbat; Dint; Diplomacy; Discombobulate; Disgruntled and gruntled; Disintermediation; Ditto; Ditty bag; Divagation; Dog and pony show; Dog in the manger; Dogme 95; Dogsbody; Dog-whistle politics; Doh!; Domesday; Domotics; Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater; Done and done; Donkey’s years; Donnybrook; Doohickey; Doolally tap; Doozy; Dope; Dopp kit; Doryphore; Dot and carry one; DOTS; Double possessive; Double-dog dare you; Doughboy; Doula; Down to the wire; Downshifter; Dozenal; Dracontology; Drag; Draw a line in the sand; Dreaded lurgi; Dressed to the nines; Dress-up Thursday; Dribs and drabs; Drink it, it’ll do you good; Drive-by-wire; Droogish; Drug on the market; Drum and Gaff; Drunkard's cloak; Drunkorexia; Dry run; Duck soup; Ducks and drakes; Ducks in a row; Duct tape; Dude; Duke’s mixture; Dulcarnon; Dumbbell; Dumbledore; DVD; Dwarf planet; Dwile flonking; Dydler; Dyspraxia.

Erstellt: 2021-03

E

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


E Eagre; Earl Grey tea; Early doors; Easy Pickings; Eating Crow; Eavesdropper; E-bandoned; Ebonics; Ecdysiast; Echo boomer; Eco-auditor; Eco-cement; Eco-driving; Ecofact; Ecologism; Economy-class syndrome; Econophysics; Ecotarianism; Ecotherapy; Edacious; E-day; Ee; Eellogofusciouhipoppokunurious; Egg on one’s face; Egg somebody on; Eggcorns; Eggplant; Eggy; Egregious; Egyptian days; Eighty-six; Electroclash; Electromagnetic hypersensitivity; Electronic cinema; Electronic paper; Electrosmog; Eleemosynary; Elementary, my dear IUPAC; Elephant and Castle; Elephant in the room; Ell; Embuggerance; Emmet and grockle; Emo; Emoji; Empasm; Emuscation; Enchiridion; Endocrine disrupter; Engastrimyth; Engine and Motor; English is difficult; Enormity; Enquire versus inquire; Ensorcelled; Enthuse; Enthusiast; Entitlement card; E-num; Envirocrime; Envision versus envisage; Epeolatry; Ephebicide; Ephebicide; Ephebiphobia; Epicaricacy; Epigenome; Epilimnion; Epizeuxis; Ergophobia; Erumpent; E-science; Esculent; Esprit de l’escalier; Estovers; Esurience; Etaoin shrdlu; Etheromaniac; Ethical fading; Ethnic; E-thrombosis; Etiquette; Eugeroic; Euro-creep; Euroland; Europanto; Evernet; Evidence-based education; Evo-devo; E-voting; Exception that proves the rule; Exercise bulimia; Exformation; Eximious; Exoplanet; Experience; Experimental travel; Exposome; Extranet; Extraordinary rendition; Eyerobics; Eyot.

Erstellt: 2021-03

F

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


F Fabless; Face the music; Facile; Facinorous; Factotum; Faffing; Faggot; Fainites; Fair cop; Fair dinkum; Fair to middling; Fall guy; Family; Fan; Fandangle; Fanfaronade; Fantods; Far From the Madding Gerund; Farb; Fard; Fardel; Farrago; Fashionista; Fat tax; Fatootsed; Faux Pas?; Fawn; Faze; Fears and dreads; Feckless; Feebate; Feghoot; Femtocell; Fender; Ferret; Fescennine; Festucine; Fewmet; Fiasco; Fib; Fibres from the Earth; Fiddler’s Green; Fiddlesticks; Fidimplicitary; Fight like Kilkenny cats; File; Filemot; Film trailer; Fimbriated; Finagle; Financephalograph; Financial phobia; Fine fettle; Fink; First, Second and Third; First, second and third worlds; Fish-faced; Fist; Fit to be tied; Fizgig; Flabbergasted; Flagitious; Flamenco; Flammable; Flapdoodle; Flash mob; Flat; Flavicomous; Fletcherise; Flibbertigibbet; Floccinaucinihilipilification; Florilegium; Flummox; Fly in the face of; Fog; Fogou; Foison; Folderol; Folksonomy; Foofaraw; Foot the bill; Footfall; Footloose and fancy free; For appearance’s sake; For Pete’s sake; Former wines are passed away; Fornication; Forte; Forthwith; Fossick; Foudroyant; Fowler’s Modern English Usage, Fourth Edition; Franglais; Fratire; Freecycling; Freegan; Freelance; Free-running; French fries; Frequency of initial letters; Frick and Frack; Friend and pitcher; Frigorific; Frisbee; Fritinancy; Fro; From cellar to dome; From Elvish to Klingon; From hero to goat; From pillar to post; From soup to nuts; From whence; Frontispiece; Froward; Fuck; Fuddy-duddy; Fudge; Fugleman; Fuliginous; Funambulist; Funk; Funner and funnest; Furbelow; Furthest and farthest; Fusion inhibitor; Fustigate; Fustilugs; Fuzz.

Erstellt: 2021-03

G

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


G Gaberlunzie; Gadget; Gadzooks; Gafiate; Gainsay; Galanthophile; Galimatias; Galligaskins; Gallimaufry; Gallivant; Galoot; Gamification; Gamp; Gander; Gander month; Ganderflanking; Gandy dancer; Gantlope; Garbage in, garbage out; Garbler; Garboil; Gargalesis; Garnish versus Garnishee; Garth; Gas and gaiters; Gastro-diplomacy; Gazebo; Gazump; Geis; Gelotologist; Gender-neutral pronouns; Gene chip; Genetic pollution; Genetic underclass; Geocaching; Geo-engineering; Geosequestration; Geronimo; Get ahead, get a hat; Get one’s goat; Getting a word into dictionaries; Ghoulies and Ghosties; Gibberish; Gibbous; Gibus; Gifable; Gig; Gigantic; Gimcrack; Gingerly; Ginglyform; Girl and youth; Gist; Git; Give it some welly; Give no quarter; Give one’s eye teeth; Give someone the sack; Give the mitten; Glamping; Glass slipper; Glebe; Global dimming; Global distillation; Globesity; Glycomics; Gnathonic; Go hence without day; Goat and Compasses; Gobbledygook; Gobemouche; Gobo; Gobsmacked; God willing and the creek don’t rise; Godwottery; Going Dutch; Going south; Going spare; Going to hell in a handbasket; Going to the dogs; Goldbricking; Gold-collar worker; Golden rice; Golf; Gomer; Gone for a Burton; Gonfalon; Gong farmer; Gongoozler; Good egg; Gooding; Goody two shoes; Goon; Goose-step; Gorbellied; Gordon Bennett; Gorge-walking; Gormagon; Gorp; Gossypiboma; Gotham; Gowk; Gowpen; Grand slam; Grangerise; Grapefruit; Grasp the nettle; Grass; Grass roots; Grass widow; Gravitas; Gravy train; Grawlix; Great Recession; Great Scott; Great Wen; Green famine; Green roof; Green room; Green’s Dictionary of Slang; Green-ink letter; Gremial; Gremlin; Grexit; Grey goo; Grey literature; Grid; Grid computing; Griffonage; Grime; Grimoire; Gringo; Grocerant; Grog; Grok; Groovy; Ground zero; Groundswell; Groze; Grub; Gubernatorial; Guddling; Guerrilla gig; Guff; Guinea pig; Guiser; Gunsel; Gurning; Gussied up; Gutkha; Gutta-percha, Ketchup, Sago; Guy Fawkes night; Gyp: pain; Gyp: thieve; Gyre.

Erstellt: 2021-03

H

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


H Haberdasher; Habiliments; Hackneyed; Haggard; Ha-ha; Hail fellow well met; Hair of the dog; Hairbrained; Hairy at the heel; Hairy eyeballs; Halcyon; Halt; Ham; Hammer and tongs; Handbag; Handfasting; Handicap; Handicapped; Hands off?; Handsel Monday; Hang a Louie; Hang fire; Hangover; Hap; Haplology; Happy as a clam; Happy as a sandboy; Happy as Larry; Happy slapping; Haptic; Hard graft; Hard lines; Harsh one’s mellow; Harum-scarum; Haruspex; Hat trick; Hate-watching; Haute barnyard; Have no truck with; Have one’s guts for garters; Have your cake and eat it; Haymaker; Haywire; Head over heels; Hearth-money; Heat; Heath Robinson; Heavens to Betsy; Hebdomadal; Hebesphenomegacorona; Hebetude; Hedera; Hedonometer; Heebie-jeebies; Heighth; Heiligenschein; Heliotrope; Hem and haw; Herb; Herf; Heroin chic; Heterography; Hidden hunger; Hide one’s light under a bushel; Higgledy-piggledy; Higgler; High dudgeon; High jinks; High Street; Hill of beans; Hillbillies; Hingle; Hippie; Hippodroming; Hircocervus; His nibs; Historical forms of the possessive; Hobbledehoy; Hobo; Hobson’s choice; Hocus-pocus; Hodening; Hodmandod; Hoity-toity; Hokey-pokey; Hole in the wall; Holy cow!; Holy smoke; Home in on; Home zone; Homeshoring; Honeyfuggle; Honeymoon; Honky-tonk; Honorificabilitudinitatibus; Honour and honorary; Hoodwink; Hoo-ha; Hooker; Hooligan; Hooplehead; Hoosegow; Hoosier; Hootenanny; Hop the twig; Hopefully; Horlicks; Horns of a dilemma; Hornswoggle; Horse creature; Horse latitudes; Horsefeathers; Hot desking; Hot dog; Houghmagandy; How bona to vada your eek!; How Many Words?; How to Promote your Dictionary; How Words Enter the Language; How’s your father; Hoyden; Huckleberry; Hue and cry; Hugger-mugger; Hullabaloo; Human safari; Humdudgeon; Humicubation; Humongous; Hundred days; Hung parliament; Hunker down; Hunky-dory; Hush puppy; Hwyl; Hybrid CD; Hydrodyne process; Hydrogen economy; Hyetal; Hyperborean; Hypercar; Hyperlocal; Hypermiling; Hypernova; Hyphen; Hypnobioscope; Hypnopompic.

Erstellt: 2021-03

I

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


I I before E except after C; I could care less; I feel good; I should cocoa; I Spy Gry!; I’m Not Hanging Noodles on Your Ears; Ice house; Ichthyophagous; Identity theft; Idioticon; Ignivomous; Ignoramus; Ilk; Illeism; Immense chemical names; Immensikoff; I-mode; Impactful Ignorals; Impeach; Impignorate; Importantly; Imposthume; In a trice; In cold blood; In like Flynn; In silico; In the field; In the Land of Invented Languages; Incalescence; Incarnadine; Incunabulum; Indefinite article before words starting with H; Indexes versus indices; Indian summer; Inenarrable; Infandous; Influenza; Information fatigue syndrome; Information rich/information poor; Informavore; Infowar; Infra dig; Infundibulum; Inglenook; Ingrained; Injecting room; Inkhorn terms; In-laws; Inplacement; Insinuendo; Insult; Interesterification; Intermercial; Internet; Internet 2; Internet of things; Interrobang; Interweb, Internetweb and Intertube; Intranet; Inwit; Iraqification; Iris code; Irish twins; Irregardless; Irritable male syndrome; Is This a Word?; Isabelline; Ishkabibble; It ain’t over till the fat lady sings; It’s a dog’s life; It’s Greek to me; Ivory tower; Ivy League; Ixnay.

Erstellt: 2021-03

J

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


J Jack; Jackalope; Jackanapes; Jackpot; Jacob’s join; Jactitation; Jaculation; Jafaikan; Jake-leg; Jalopy; Jamoke; Janus-faced; Jay-walking; Jazz; Jeep; Jejune; Jentacular; Jericho; Jesus H Christ; Jiggery-pokery; Jimmy a lock; Jingoism; Jinx; Jitney; Jobation; Jobbernowl; Jobsworth; Jocund; Joe; Joe Soap; John; John Doe; Johnny-on-the-spot; Jollop; Jolly hockey-sticks; Jorum; Josser; Joystick; Jubilee; Juju & jujube; Jukebox; Jumbo; Jumentous; Jump the shark; Jumper; Jumping Jehoshaphat; Jury rigged; Just des(s)erts.

Erstellt: 2021-03

K

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


K Kakistocracy; Kakuro; Kangaroo court; Katy bar the door; Katzenjammer; Keep it under your hat; Keep mum; Keep your eyes peeled; Kelemenopy; Kelsey’s nuts; Kerfuffle; Ketchup versus catsup; Kettle of fish; Kettling; Kibibyte; Kick the bucket; Kidding on the square; Killick; Kilometre; Kilroy was here; Kilter; Kinetoscope; King Charles’s Head; Kip; Kippers and curtains; Kiss the gunner’s daughter; Kith; Kitty; Kitty-corner; Kludge; Knock seven bells out of someone; Know the ropes; Know your onions; Knucker.

Erstellt: 2021-03

L

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


L Labretifery; Lackadaisical; Ladult; Lagan; Lagniappe; Lame duck; Landing; Larrikin; Larval therapy; Lasagne; Latrinalia; Latrociny; Lazy Susan; Lead-pipe cinch; Lead-swinger; Leechcraft; Left holding the bag; Left in the lurch; Leiotrichous; Leisure sickness; Lemniscate; Let the cat out of the bag; Leucipottomy; Lewd; Lexiphanic; Lickety-split; Lie Doggo; Lieutenant; Life of riley; Lifestyle drug; Lightcraft; Lightning in a bottle; Like a banshee; Like the clappers; Like the dickens; Likeness; Lilly-low; Limerick; Limitrophe; Linguistic profiling; Linhay; Linsey-woolsey; Lipogrammatist; Lippitude; Liripipe; List; List slippers; Lithophone; Living daylights, the; Lizzie Tish (or Tizzy Lish); Lo and behold; Lobbyist; Loblolly boy; Locavore; Lock, stock and barrel; Logan stone; Loggerhead; Logocidal; Logodaedalus; Logomaniac; Lollapaloosa; Lollygag; London to a brick; Long arm of the law; Long johns; Long tail; Longman Pronunciation Dictionary; Loo; Loophole; Lope; Lord love a duck; Lorinery; Losing one’s marbles; Love these crazy titles!; Lucubration; Ludibrious; Lukewarm; Lump it; Lush; Lustrum; Lycanthropy; Lynch.

Erstellt: 2021-03

M

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


M Macaronic; Machicolation; Machinima; Macilent; Mad as a hatter; Mad as cheese; Mad as hops; Maggot; Magiric; Magnetar; Magnoperate; Maieutic; Mail; Make a hames of something; Make ends meet; Make no bones about it; Makebate; Making love; Malacia; Malapert; Malarkey; Mallemaroking; Maloik; Malvertising; Mammock; Man date; Man of straw; Manavilins; Mangel-wurzel; Manicule; Mansuetude; Manticore; Mare’s nest; Mari-fuel; Maritorious; Marketopia; Marmalade; Marmalise; Marthambles; Marylebone stage; Mash note and masher; Mastigophorous; Materteral; Mathom; Mattoid; Maundy; Mayfair; Mazoola; McGuffin; McJob; M-commerce; MDR-TB; Mechatronics; Medium; Meeting room jargon; Megilp; Meld; Meldrew; Meme; MEMS; Menaissance; Merismus; Meritocracy; Merrythought; Mesh radio; Mesmerise; Mess; Metagrobolise; Metamediary; Metemptosis; Meteoric rise; Methinks; Metoposcopist; Metrosexual; M-government; Mickey Finn; Microcredit; Microgreens; Microtransaction; Micro-wind turbine; Mighty Fine Words and Smashing Expressions; Migrate; Millennium; Millennium bug; Milquetoast; Mimsy; Mind the Gaffe; Mind the greens!; Mind your beeswax; Mind Your Ps and Qs; Minigarch; MINT; Misanthrope; Misomusist; Misplaced Modifiers; Missing opposites; Mistress; Miswanting; Mithridate; Mobisode; Mociology; Mogadored; Moggie; Molecular Archaeology; Molecular farming; Molecular gastronomy; Moletronics; Mollycoddling; Mollydooker; Moment; Money matters; Mongo; Moniker; Monkey wrench; Monkey’s uncle; Monkey’s wedding; Mononymous; Monstering; MOOC; Mooch; Mooncalf; Moonshine; Mooreeffoc; Moot point; More than one way to skin a cat; Morgan’s Orchard; Morganatic; Mortarboard; Mortsafe; Mosey; Mountainboarding; Mournival; Moxie; Mrs; Muchness; Mudlark; Mufti; Muggins; Mugwump; Mulct; Muliebrious; Mullered; Mulligrubs; Mumblecore; Mumchance; Mummer; Mumping; Mumpsimus; Mundungus; Murder; Murphy’s Law; Muscle dysmorphia; Musterdevillers; Mutoscope; Mx; My fellow Merkins; My giddy aunt; Mycodiesel; Myriad; Myrmidon.

Erstellt: 2021-03

N

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


N Naff; Nail; Nakation; Naked Street; Namby-pamby; Nano; Nanofood; Nanopublishing; Napping; NaSSA; Natiform; Nauseous versus nauseated; Nave; Navvy; Naysayer; NDM-1; Near miss; Nebbishy; Needs must when the devil drives; Nepenthes; Nerd; Nescient; Net neutrality; Neurobics; Neurocinematics; Neuroeconomics; Neuromarketing; Neurosexism; Neurotheology; New; New Puritans; New Words in the News; New York minute; News; Newspapergate; Niche; Nick of time; Niddering; Nidicolous; Niggardly; Nihilartikel; Nimrod; Nincompoop; Nine days’ wonder; Nineteen to the dozen; Ninnyhammer; Nipcheese; Nipperkin; Nit-picking; Nitty-gritty; No names, no pack drill; No room to swing a cat; No soap; No Trees in the Forest?; Nocebo; Noggin; Nomophobia; Nonce; Nonplussed; Nordic walking; Nosopoetic; Nostoc; Nosy parker; Not a happy bunny; Not a word to Bessie!; Not by a long chalk; Not my pigeon; Not on your tintype; Not so green as you’re cabbage-looking; Not this little black duck!; Not to be sneezed at; Nothing like leather; Notta Lotta Nottle; Nous; Nubbing-cheat; Nuciform; Nugiperous; Nu-metal; Nummits and crummits; Nurdle; Nut-crack night; Nutraceutical; Nutrigenomics; Nychthemeron; Nye; Nympholepsy.

Erstellt: 2021-03

O

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


O Oaf; Obdiplostemonous; Obesogenic; Obnubilate; Oche; Ocker; Octothorpe; Odd; Odd-shoe boy; OED Historical Thesaurus; Of messes in pots; Of thimbleriggers and joculators; OK; OK; Old besom; Old Dart; Old fogey; Old leather-arse; Old-fashioned look; Olitory; Ollie ollie oxen free; Ombre; Omnishambles; Omnium-gatherum; Omphaloskepsis; On a hiding to nowhere; On a wing and a prayer; On all fours; On one’s tod; On pins and needles; On tenterhooks; On the Adrian; On the ball; On the fritz; On the lam; On the QT; On the wagon; On your uppers; Once upon a time; One another; One fell swoop; One might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb; Oneirodynia; One-off; Only joking?; Onomasticon; Onomatopoeia; Onshore offshoring; Onychophagist; Ooglification; Oojah; Open source; Opisthograph; Opodeldoc; Optics; Optogenetics; Opusculum; Orange; Orchidelirium; Orexin; Orey-eyed; Organic; Organogram; Orientated versus oriented; Orismology; Orotund; Orrery; Orthorexia; Oryzivorous; Oscillon; Ostrobogulous; Otpotss; Out like Lottie’s eye; Out of sorts; Out of whack; Over a barrel; Over the moon; Over the yardarm; Overclass; Overweening; Oxford comma; Oxford Dictionary of English; Oxter; Oyez.

Erstellt: 2021-03

P

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


P Pace egg play; Padania; Pagan; Pain versus pine; Painient; Pair of pants; Palermo scale; Palimpsest; Pall-mall; Palooka; Palpebrous; Pander; Pandiculation; Panel; Panglossian; Panhandle; Panic; Panic button; Panjandrum; Panking pole; Panorama; Pantechnicon; Pants; Paparazzo; Paralipsis; Paraphernalia; Paraprosdokian; Pardon my French!; Paregoric; Pareidolia; Paroemiological; Part and parcel; Part brass rags; Passenger; Passive drinking; Passive survivability; Past master; Pastinaceous; Patent troll; Patibulary; Patient; Pavonine; Peanut gallery; Pearls of wisdom; Pear-shaped; Pecksniffian; Peely-wally; Pelf; Penny dreadful; Penny for your thoughts; People Versus Persons; Peradventure; Percontation; Perfect storm; Perissology; Peristeronic; Permission-based marketing; Personal telco; Peruse; Perverb; Petard; Peter out; Petrichor; Pettifogging; Phage therapy; Phantasmagoria; Pharmacogenomics; Pharming; Pharology; Phen-fen; Phenology; Phenomenon; Philanthropreneur; Philogynist; Phishing; Phizzog; Photo cut-outs; Phrop; Phytoremediation; Picadil; Picayune; Picnic; Pico-projector; Pie; Pie in the sky; Piepowder; Piffy on a rock bun; Pig in a poke; Pig sick; Piggy bank; Piggyback; Pigs might fly; Pigwidgeon; Piker; Pilcrow; Pilgarlic; Pillaloo; Pinch of salt; Pinchbeck; Pinguescence; Pinkie; Piping hot; Piss-poor; Pitch; Pitmatic; Placeshifting; Plain English Campaign Awards 2002; Plain English Campaign Awards 2003; Plan B; Planet; Plasticarian; Plat; Play it by ear; Playing gooseberry; Pleased as Punch; Plenilune; Plonk; Pluck the gowans fine; Plug-ugly; Plurals in ‘-en’; Pluton; Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis; Poach; Pocillovy; Pod slurping; Podcasting; Po-faced; Pogey; Pogonotrophy; Point-blank; Policy wonk; Polish off; Political stripe; Pollyanna; Poltroon; Polyamory; Polychronic; Polypill; Pom; Pony up; Poodle-faker; Pop goes the weasel; Pop one’s clogs; Popinjay; Poppycock; Poppysmic; Porphyrogeniture; Port Out, Starboard Home; Portal site; Portfolio; Portolan; Posh; Positronic; Possessive Apostrophes; Possessives with verbal nouns; Potboiler; POTUS; Pound; Pracademic; Prat; Preantepenultimate; Prebuttal; Precariat; Precision of Lexicographers; Precrastination; Predictive policing; Predominately versus predominantly; Preposterous; Presenteeism; Presidential Voices; Prestidigitator; Pretty; Prevent; Preventative or preventive; Prick-me-dainty; Pridian; Prion; Private Eye; Pro bono publico; Probiotic; Problemsome; Prodnose; Profician; Prognosticate; Programming, Hungarian style; Prolegomenon; Promession; Pronoia; Proof of the pudding; Prosumer; Proteome; Proteomics; Protologism; Psytrance; Pulchritudinous; Pull devil, pull baker; Pull the plug; Pulling one’s leg; Punch list; Punchline; Punctuation and quotation marks; Punt; Purdonium; Purl; Purse-lipped; Push technology; Push the envelope; Pusillanimous; Put a sock in it; Put on (the) dog; Put the mockers on; Putter or potter; Putting the kibosh on it; PVR; Pyknic.

Erstellt: 2021-03

Q

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


Q Q followed by U; Quack; Quadricycle; Quantum; Qubit; Queen of Spain’s Legs; Queer somebody’s pitch; Queer Street; Quidnunc; Quillon; Quincunx; Quinion; Quinquagenary; Quiz; Quocker-wodger; Quodlibet.

Erstellt: 2021-03

R

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


R Raining cats and dogs; Rambunctious; Ramping cat; Range; Rannygazoo; Rantipole; Raparee; Rasorial; Raw foodism; Read the riot act; Real; Real McCoy, the; Reality fighting; Rear its ugly head; Rebarbative; Receipt versus recipe; Recessionista; Recreational grief; Recumbentibus; Red rag to a bull; Redd; Redding; Red-headed stepchild; Refocillate; Refugee; Regender; Religitigation; Replica; Restaurateur; Restive versus restless; Retail anthropologist; Reticent versus reluctant; Reticule; Retort; Retronym; Reuben; Reverse ferret; Revolutionary Colours; RFID; Rhadamanthine; Rhapsodomancy; Rhine; Rhino; Rhinotillexomania; Rhopalic; Rhykenology; Richard Snary; Ride shotgun; Riff-raff; Right as rain; Rigmarole; Ringer / Dead ringer; Ripsnorter; Riskometer; Road; Road metal; Robinsonade; Robodroid; Rocket; Rod; Rodomontade; Roger; Rogue; Roister-doister; Roo; Rookery; Roscid; Rotate versus revolve; Round the bend; Round-robin; Rozzer; Rub of the green; Ruckus; Rule of thumb; Rules, Britannia; Rum do; Rumbledethumps; Rush the growler; Rusticate.

Erstellt: 2021-03

S

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


S Sabermetrician; Sabrage; Safe as Houses; Safe harbour / Safe haven; Saggar; Salad days; Salmagundi; Salop; Salt of the earth; Sam Hill; San fairy ann; Sand; Sandy-grey russet; Sapid; Sapristi Nadgers!; Sarcophagus; Sardoodledom; SARS; Satisfactory; Satisficer; Saturnalia; Saucered and blowed; Saved by the bell; Saviour sibling; Say (or cry) uncle; Scacchic; Scalene; Scallywag or Scalawag; School gate mum; Schooner; Sciolist; Scobberlotcher; Scofflaw; Scombroid; Sconce; Scot free; Scotch; Scran; Screaming ab-dabs; Screenager; Screw your courage to a sticking-place; Scrimshaw; Scrumping; Scrumptious; Scutching; Scuttlebutt; Sea change; Seaborgium; Seasteading; See a man about a dog; Seersucker; See-saw; Segue; Self-quantifying; Selmelier; Semordnilap; Send down; Send to Coventry; Sennight; Sentence-initial conjunctions; Sentimental; Sequacious; Serendipity; Sesquipedalian; Set one’s cap at; Settle a score; Set-top box; Seven-year itch; Sferics; Sha’n’t versus shan’t; Shades of Meaning; Shag; Shaggy-dog story; Shake a stick at; Shank’s mare; Shanty; Sharpshooter; Shellacking; Shemozzle; Shenanigan; Shilling ordinary; Shindig; Shirttail relative; Shit; Shiver my timbers; Shock and Awe; Shoestring; Shoo-in; Shoot one’s cuffs; Shoot oneself in the foot; Shopdropping; Short shrift; Shot; Shovel-ready; Shrink; Shrinking violet; Shufti; Shyster; Siccity; Sick abed on two chairs; Sick as a dog; Sidekick; Signs for Sums; Silicon; Silver bullet; Simoleon; Since Hector was a pup; Singular or plural verb with ‘none’; Singular they; Singultient; Sipe; Sisyphean; Sitooterie; Sitting bodkin; Six ways from Sunday; Sixpenny nails; Sizzle and steak; Skedaddle; Skeleton in the closet; Skell; Skew-whiff; Skillygalee; Skimble-skamble; Skimmington; Skinny; Skint; Skive; Skivvies; Skosh; Skulduggery; Skunk works; Sky-blue pink; Sky-surfing; Slang; Slang: The People’s Poetry; Slanging match; Slangwhanger; Sledging; Sleep tight; Sleeping one’s head into train oil; Sling one’s hook; Slipshod; Slow travel; Slubberdegullion; Slumgullion; Smaragdine; Smart Alec; Smart as paint; Smart gun; Smartbook; Smarty pants; Smellfeast; Smelling of the lamp; Smithereens; Smouch; Snake oil; Snarge; Sneap; Snickersnee; Snit; Snob; Snollygoster; Snooter; So dull you could ride to China on them; So help me Hannah; Soap opera; Soapbox; Sobriquet; Social jet lag; Social software; Sock it to them; Sockdolager; Soft sawder; Softly, softly, catchee monkey; Sojourner; Solar sail; Solutionism; Solutions journalism; Somniloquent; Sonic cruiser; Sonofusion; Sooth; Sophisticated; Sophrosyne; Soup and fish; Souped-up; Sous-Sherpa; Southpaw; Sow one’s wild oats; Spade; Spamdexing; Spanghew; Spanish practices; Spatchcock; Spatterdashes; Speaking out of school; Spelling bee; Spelunking; Spendthrift; Spermodynamics; Sphairistike; Sphexish; Sphragistics; Spick and span; Spiff; Spifflicate; Spill the beans; Spin a yarn; Spinster; Spintronics; Spissitude; Spitting feathers; Spitting image; Spiv; Spoil; Spoken Web; Spondulicks; Sponging-house; Spoonerism; Sport one’s oak; Spot of tea; Sputnik; Squabash; Squalamine; Square; Square meal; Squared away; Squaw; Squilgee; Staddle; Stag-deflation; Stammel; Standing pie; Stannator; Staple; Stars and garters; Start from scratch; State of the art; Stationary versus stationery; Staycation; Steal one’s thunder; Steam radio; Steganography; Stemwinder; Step-; Stepney; Sternutatory; Stick one’s oar in; Stick-in-the-mud; Sticky wicket; Stiff upper lip; Stillicide; Stitched up like a kipper; Stone the crows; Stonking; Stool pigeon; Stoozing; Stotting; Strait and narrow; Stramonium; Strickle; Strop; Struthonian; Stultiloquy; Stylite; Subfusc; Sublime; Subnivean; Subprime; Suburb; Succedaneum; Sudoku; Suffonsified; Sugar and sure; Sugar daddy; Sulphur; Sundae; Sunday throat; Supererogation; Supernaculum; Surrebutter; Swag; Swain; Swamper; Swan song; Swanning around; Swan-upping; Swashbuckling; Swazzle; Swearing on one’s testicles; Swiz; Swoose; Sycophant; Symploce; Synaesthete; Synecdoche and metonymy; Synthespian; Synthetic biology; Syzygy.

Erstellt: 2021-03

T

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


T Tabloid; Tabnabs; Tacky; Tacky; Tagarene; Taghairm; Take a powder; Take the biscuit; Take the mickey; Take the piss; Talaria; Talk turkey; Talking Turkey; Tall tale; Tantivy; Taphonomist; Tapping the Admiral; Taqwacore; Taradiddle; Target; Tarred with the same brush; Tatterdemalion; Tattoo; Tautochrone; Tawdry; Tax; Taxi; Tchotchke; Teaching one’s grandmother to suck eggs; Teamspace; Techgnosis; Technorealist; Teetotal; Teetotum; Teknonymy; Teleplasmic; Televersity; Television 2.0; Teller; Tempest in a teapot; Tergiversate; Termagant; Terms using Dutch; Terraforming; Terrific; Test This Question; Tetrapyloctomy; Thank your mother for the rabbits; That’s all she wrote; Thatcher's Linguistic Legacy; Thaumaturgy; The abbreviation ‘pp’; The balloon’s gone up; The cat’s mother; The cheese gets binding; The Colour of Words; The E- prefix; The ending -ati; The ending -nomics; The ending -wards; The endings ‘-ise’ and ‘-ize’; The First English Slang Dictionary; The Full Monty; The Great Element Chase; The Grouchy Grammarian; The Language Myth; The Lure of the Red Herring; The Mighty Burger; The Miller’s Tale; The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang; The Sense of Style by Steven Pinker; The Stories of English; The whole megillah; The Whole Nine Yards; The whole shebang; The Word at War; The Words of Dickens; Thelemic; Theodolite; Theranostics; Therapeutic cloning; There’s the rub; Therianthrope; Thimbles and thumbs; Thin client; Thinspiration; Third Way; Thirteen and the odd; Thrasonical; Three books in brief; Three sheets in the wind; Through the Blender; Through the grapevine; Throw a tub to a whale; Throw in the towel; Thrown for a loop; Thwart; Tickety-boo; Tiddlywinks; Tide one over; Tiffin; Tilly-vally; Time out of mind; Tin Pan Alley; Tinhorn; Tinker’s damn; Tinny; Tintamarre; Tintinnabulation; Tip; Tit for tat; Titch; Titivil; Titubation; To a T; To be in someone’s black books; To boot; To buy the farm; To wit; Toad-eater; Toad-in-the-hole; Toast; Toe the line; Toe-rag; Toffee-nosed; Toise; Tolfraedic; Tolley; Tom; Tomfoolery; Ton; Tontine; Toodle-pip; Top dog; Top notch; Toploftical; Topsy-turvy; Tosticated; Totter; Touch and go; Touch wood/knock on wood; Tourbillion; Town of Trades; Toxicogenomics; Tracklements; Traffic evaporation; Transition Town; Travellers to Antique Lands; T-ray; Treasure-House of the Language; Trebuchet; Triacle; Trig and trim; Trimmer; Trip the light fantastic; Triple-drug therapy; Tripudiate; Triskaidekaphobia; Trivial; Troop; Troubleshoot; Trove; Truckle; True blue; True facts; Truepenny; Trussell; Truthiness; Try and; Tsar; Tsunami; Tub thumping; Tufthunter; Tumbarumba; Tundra; Turdiform; Turducken; Turgescent; Turlough; Turn up for the book; Turnpike; Tussie-mussie; Twaddle; Twee; Tweenager; Tweenie; Twenty-three Skidoo; Twitterpated; Twixter; Two Australian expressions; Two hoots; Two-car funeral; Two-factor authentication; Type louse.

Erstellt: 2021-03

U

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


U Ugsome; Ullage; Ultimo; Ultracrepidarian; Umami; Umbrage; Umpty; Umquhile; UMTS; Un- versus In-; Unclarity; Unconference; Under the rose; Under weigh; Understand; Understrapper; Unfriend; Union; Unipedal; Unitasker; Unobtainium; Unpaired words; Unputdownable; Until, till and ’til; Up in Annie’s room; Up the creek; Up the spout; Up to snuff; Up to speed; Upper crust; Upset the apple cart; Upsidaisy; Upsizing; Upskilling; Urban gaming; Urtication; Usufructuary.

Erstellt: 2021-03

V

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


V Vaccary; Vaccimulgence; Valetudinarian; Vamp; Vape; Vection; Vegelate; Vehicle-to-Grid; Velleity; Vellicate; Vellichor; Velocipedist; Venery; Verbatim; Verbigeration; Verecund; Vet; Vexillology; Viatical; Vigintillion; Vigorish; Vilipend; Vinolent; Virescent; Virosphere; Virotherapist; Virtopsy; Virtual water; Virtual Words; Vlogger; V-mail; Volitation; Volleyballene; Voluntourism; Volvelle; Vomitorium; Vote; Vril; Vulcan; Vulgar fractions.

Erstellt: 2021-03

W

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


W W00t; Waddle; Waffling; Wag; Wait; Waiting for the other shoe to drop; Walker!; Wanion; WAP; Warchalking; Wardour Street English; Wassail; Watch; Water banking; Water poverty; Water war; Watershed; Wave and pay; Wax poetic; Ways of Eating; Waywiser; Wayzgoose; Weakest go to the wall; Weaved or wove?; Web 2.0; Web ring; Webucation; Weeds in the Garden of Words; Weight of public opinion; Weightless economy; Weird; Weird and Wonderful Words; Welfare; Welkin; Well heeled; Well, blow me!; West Brit; Wet day centre; Wet one’s whistle; Whale of a time; What am I? Chopped liver?; What Paddy shot at; Wheeling and dealing; Whelmed; Where it’s at; Whet one’s appetite; Which came first: he or she?; Which versus that; Whiffler; Whiff-waff; While versus whilst; While versus wile; Whilom; Whim-wham for a goose’s bridle; Whip round; Whipping-boy; Whistle-stop tour; White lie; Who coined forecast?; Whole ball of wax; Whole cloth; Whole kit and kaboodle; Whopper-jawed; Whose; Whys and wherefores; Widdiful; Widget; Widow’s peak; Widowered; Wigg; Wigs on the green; Wikitorial; Wild West; Wildcat strike; Wildfire; Williwaw; Will-o’-the-wisp; Willy-nilly; Windy City; Wine bottle sizes; Wiseacre; Witching hour; Within a gnat’s ...; Wittol; Wobbegong; Woebegone; Won’t; Word of finger; Word Origins and How We Know Them; Words for the numbers following ten; Words of 1997; Words of 1998; Words of 2001; Words of 2002; Words of 2003; Words of 2011; Words of the Year 2007; Words of the Year 2012; Words of the Year 2015; Words, Words, Words; Work; Work cut out; Wormwood; Worry wart; Worth the candle; Wrack or rack?; Writing and Script; Wrong and wrongly; Wrong end of the stick; Wrong side of the bed.

Erstellt: 2021-03

X

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


X XDR-TB; Xenoglossy; Xenotransplantation; Xenozoonosis; Xeric.

Erstellt: 2021-03

Y

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


Y Yaffle; Yale; Yaoi; Yarely; Yclept; Ye gods and little fishes!; Yealm; Year dot; Year’s mind; Yedsirag; Yehudi did it; Yogurt; Yonks; You snowing me?; Your carriage awaits, Mr Holmes; Your name is mud; Yuhangyuan; Yuletide.

Erstellt: 2021-03

Z

WWW
World Wide Words - Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/genindex.htm

Index


Z Zany; Zemblanity; Zenzizenzizenzic; Zilch; Zip; Zograscope; Zoilism; Zoochosis; Zorbing; Zymurgy.

Erstellt: 2021-03

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
eXterne Wortlisten
WWW - World Wide Words

A

B

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D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

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M

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P

Q

Quinion, Michael - Gall
Gallimaufry
A Hodgepodge of Our Vanishing Vocabulary

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/gallimaufry.htm

gallimaufry (noun)

From the cover

Words are always changing, and here best-selling language writer Michael Quinion has made his own selection of some of the most interesting examples of words and meanings that are vanishing from our vocabulary. Sometimes a word is lost when the thing it describes becomes obsolete: would you wear a billycock? Sometimes it survives in a figurative sense while the original meaning is lost: what was the first paraphernalia? Sometimes it simply gives way to a more popular alternative: who still goes to the picture house to watch the talkies? The story of these and many other words is brought vividly to life by the author, and illustrated by numerous historical references and quotations from writers down the years, including Samuel Pepys and Jane Austen, William Shakespeare and Patrick O’Brian.

An extract from the book

Two of the three classic styles of men’s headwear of the period were actually popularised by actresses. The fedora, later to be the classic topping of the Italian-American mobster, was named after the title and main character in a famous play by the French playwright Victorien Sardou, first performed in 1882 with Sarah Bernhardt as the hat-wearing Russian princess Fédora Romanov. The name of the trilby comes from a play adapted by the American Paul Potter from a book by George du Maurier. The latter had been an immense hit when it came out in 1894, as a writer in the New York Tribune in March 1895 wailed:

We are beset by a veritable epidemic of Trilby fads. Trilby bonnets and gowns and shoes, Trilby accents of speech and Trilby poses of person. Trilby tableaux, teas and dances. Trilby ice cream and Trilby sermons, Trilby clubs and reading classes and prize examinations, Trilby nomenclature for everybody and everything.

The play was brought over to London in November 1895 by the impresario Beerbohm Tree and was a huge success, ensuring that the hat worn by the bare-footed, chain-smoking, 20-year-old leading lady Dorothea Baird would become part of the British Trilby craze. Her picture, wearing that hat, appeared on postcards, in advertisements, on chocolate boxes, and in newspapers.

Women’s hats of the period also had names with literary associations. The Dolly Varden was large, with one side bent down, “abundantly trimmed with flowers” as the Oxford English Dictionary puts it. The name came from the coquettish character in Charles Dickens’s Barnaby Rudge. The fashion for it started about 1872, but it was not universally popular, it would seem, to judge from a snooty comment in The Athens Messenger (the one in Ohio) in May that year:

The maids of Athens, and the matrons too, do not take to Dolly Vardens worth a cent.

In the same month, Harper’s Weekly commented,

Was ever any new costume more criticized than the new ‘Dolly Varden’.

Another a little later was the Merry Widow, an ornate and wide-brimmed hat whose style and name derived from the hat worn by Lily Elsie in the London premiere of Franz Lehar’s operetta in June 1907. The show made Ms Elsie a star and the focus of a craze, just as happened with Dorothea Baird a decade earlier. Her picture—wearing that hat, of course—appeared very widely in advertisements and picture postcards. This style was as common in the US as in Britain; Wu Tingfang wrote in confusion in his book America Through the Spectacles of an Oriental Diplomat in 1914 that

There you will see women wearing ‘Merry Widow’ hats who are not widows but spinsters, or married women whose husbands are very much alive, and the hats in many cases are as large as three feet in diameter.

He was right about their size. Some American examples became so large, in fact, that a postcard of the time featured a wearer staring sadly at a sign by a lift:

Ladies with Merry Widow Hats Take Freight Elevator.

Publishing details

Gallimaufry: A Hodgepodge of Our Vanishing Vocabulary is published by Oxford University Press. Hardcover: ISBN 0-19-861062-9, pp272; the publisher’s price in the UK is £12.99 and in the USA is $25.00. Paperback: ISBN 978-0-19-955102-6; now available worldwide; the publisher’s UK price is £8.99.


Erstellt: 2021-03

Quinion, Michael - OaI
Ologies and Isms
A Dictionary Of Word Beginnings And Endings

(E?)(L?) https://www.biblio.com/9780192801234

Ologies And Isms A Dictionary Of Word Beginnings And Endings (Oxford Paperback Reference)

by Michael Quinion

ISBN 13: 9780192801234

ISBN 10: 0192801236

Paperback; Oxford: Oxford University Press, USA, April 3, 2003; ISBN-13: 978-0192801234


Sprache: Englisch
Broschiert - 288 Seiten - Oxford University Press
Erscheinungsdatum: 13. Oktober 2005
Auflage: Reissue
ISBN: 0192806408


Over 10,000 examples of word affixes to help you to decode word meanings.

This book covers topics such as Aquaculture, Haemophilia, Isochronous, Neuralgia, Polyunsaturated, and Rodenticide. How often do we see a technical word without quite knowing what it means? If we can decipher it - undo its language code - we can start to understand others of a similar kind. For example, if we know that words beginning with "aqua" are to do with "water", then we are half way to understanding the word "aquaculture". "Ologies and Isms" is about the building blocks of the English language - the beginnings and endings and sometimes the middles - that help form or adapt many of the words we use.

Whether you're a student or a practitioner, a teacher of English, an inveterate word-user, or just a seeker-out of linguistic trifles, the book should help you understand better the language of your workplace and the world around you. The text contains over 10,000 examples within 1250 entries and a selective thematic index breaks prefixes and suffixes down by theme, including biochemistry and drugs, living world, places and people.

We all have a childlike love of playing with words, adding bits, Lego-style, to create new ones. And we often wonder where words come from and how they are formed.

This book fills a gap we hardly knew existed. Ologies and Isms is about the building blocks of the English language—the beginnings and endings, sometimes the middles—that help create many of the words we use. How often do we see a common technical or medical word without quite knowing what it means? Does your blood run cold when you hear haemophilia; do you pale at paleobotany? If we can decipher such words, we can start to understand others of a similar kind.


Erstellt: 2021-03

Quinion, Michael - POSH
Port Out Starboard Home
Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds
Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins
Language Myths

In einer Vorstellung des Buches wird auch von "etymythology" gesprochen. Michael Quinion hat sich also Wörter vorgenommen, um die sich viele Geschichten zu ihrer Herkunft ranken, von denen die meisten dem Reich der Phantasie entstammen.

Sprache: Englisch
Taschenbuch - 288 Seiten - HarperCollins Publishers
Erscheinungsdatum: März 2006
ISBN: 0060851538

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/posh.htm

One book, two titles. It’s called "Port Out Starboard Home" everywhere but in the US, where its title is "Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds".

It’s published in paperback by Penguin in the UK and by HarperCollins in the USA.
...
Some experts call the creation of such stories about the origins of words popular etymology or folk etymology. A large part of this book retells such mythic tales and also tries to find and explain the true stories behind them. You might like to think of it as illustrations of the imaginative ways in which people work hard to make sense of the unknown.
...
Publishing details

"Port Out Starboard Home: And Other Language Myths" is published outside the USA by Penguin Books. Hardcover: ISBN 0140515348, pp304; UK price £12.99. Paperback: ISBN 0141012234, pp282; UK price £7.99. In the USA it is published by the Smithsonian Institution Press under the title "Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds". Hardcover: ISBN 1588342190; pp280, US$19.95. The US paperback is published by HarperCollins; ISBN 0060851538, publisher’s list price $12.95.



Logophile Quinion, who writes a column about new words for the Daily Telegraph, proves his knowledge of familiar phrases in this energetic look at common English words and idioms. The first known use of the term "cut and dried", for example, occurred in 1710, in reference to an uninspired sermon; like herbs precut for sale in markets, the sermon lacked freshness. The notion of a "graveyard shift" did not arise from Victorian-era workers minding cemeteries to make sure people weren’t accidentally buried alive ("I love such stories, complete and utter hogwash though they are", notes the author), but dates from the early years of the 20th century, and is merely an evocative term for the night shift. From "Akimbo" (perhaps Old Norse in origin) to "Zzxjoanw" (an etymological hoax rather than a real word), Quinion tours the English language, not always offering definitive answers but generally providing the next best thing: good theories.

Words lovers, get ready to have some myths shattered. "Hot dog" didn't originate with a cartoonist who couldn't spell "frankfurter". Thomas Crapper - and he would probably be relieved to know this - did not give us the word "crap". The word "cop" is not an acronym for "constable on patrol". When he is not busting myths, the author (who runs the World Wide Words Web site) offers up origins of words and phrases most readers will probably have wondered about. We're all familiar with the phrase "happy as a... Lesen Sie mehr

What is the true origin of the phrase "one fell swoop"? Does the word "honeymoon" really derive from an old Persian custom of giving the happy couple mead, a honey wine, for the first month after the wedding? The rapid growth of the internet and the use of email has increased the circulation of (usually) false tales about the evolution of language. In this entertaining and fascinating new book on the origins of words and expressions, Michael Quinion retells the mythic tales that have become popular currency - the word "posh" deriving from "port out, starboard home" - and also tries to find and explain the true stories behind the origins of phrases. Quinion offers explanations of why and how stories about words are created, and how misunderstanding word origins - while usually harmless - can have serious consequences.

"The cat’s pajamas", "the bee’s knees", and "the whole nine yards" rolled into one, this true feast for word lovers skewers commonly accepted word-origin myths and etymological folk tales. Can it really be true that "golf" stands for "Gentlemen Only, Ladies Forbidden"? Did the term "computer bug" really derive from an errant moth shorting out an early computer? Did the "kangaroo" really get its name through a misunderstanding between explorers and natives? Did "OK" really derive from the bad spelling of a US president?

The real story of the origin and evolution of a word or phrase is often much stranger than the commonly accepted one. The expressions that Michael Quinion reviews range throughout the English-speaking world, from "cater-cornered" to "dinkum" and from "wet one’s whistle" to "happy as a clam". From the bawdy to the sublime, explanations and delightful asides truly prove that the proof is in the pudding. If you ever wondered about why we utter such oddities as "raining cats and dogs", I could care less or twenty-three skidoo, this one’s for you. It’s a treasure trove of fiction and fact for anyone interested in language.

Can it really be true that "golf" stands for "Gentlemen Only Ladies Forbidden"? Or that "rule of thumb" comes from an archaic legal principle that a man may chastise his wife, but only with a rod no thicker than his thumb? These and hundreds of other stories are commonly told and retold whenever people meet. They grow up in part because expressions are often genuinely mysterious. Why, for example, are satisfying meals "square" rather than any other shape? And how did anyone ever come up with the idea that if you're competent at something you can "cut the mustard"? Michael Quinion here retells many of the more bizarre tales, and explains their real origins where they're known. This is a fascinating treasure-trove of fiction and fact for anyone interested in language.


(E?)(L?) http://www.languagehat.com/archives/001381.php

ETYMOLOGICAL MYTHS.

The Telegraph has begun a series of excerpts from "Port Out, Starboard Home" by Michael Quinion, to be published by Penguin at £12.99 on July 1 (in the UK, obviously). The first begins with a good summary of various wrong ideas people get about where words come from and continues with a discussion of the marvelous phrase "all mouth and trousers"
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/sep/10/featuresreviews.guardianreview21

Word games

Michael Quinion intrigues Nicholas Lezard with his fascinating book of etymologies, Port Out, Starboard Home

Nicholas Lezard

The Guardian, Saturday 10 September 2005

Port Out, Starboard Home

by Michael Quinion

I am sorry, everyone, but I am going to have to murder a cherished belief. The word "crap" has nothing to do with Thomas Crapper, supposed inventor of the flush toilet. The OED cites a reference from 1846 to a "crapping ken", meaning a privy. Michael Quinion writes: "As Thomas Crapper wasn't born until 1836, didn't start his business until 1861, didn't invent the flush toilet, and didn't become well known until much later, it's clear his name had no influence on the development of the word crap."
...


Erstellt: 2021-03

Quinion, Michael - QU
Why is Q Always Followed by U?

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldwidewords.org/whyisq.htm

From the blurb

The cover of Michael Quinion's book 'Why is Q Always Followed by U?' Quinion’s answers to questions about the meanings and histories behind the quirky phrases, slang and language that we all use are set to delight, amuse and enlighten even the most knowledgeable word-obsessive.

Did you know that ‘Blighty’ comes from an ancient Arabic word? Or that Liberace cried his way to the bank so many times people think he coined the phrase? That cloud nine started out as cloud seven in 30s America? And that the first person to have their thunder stolen was a dismal playwright from Drury Lane?

Why is Q Always Followed by U? is full of surprising discoveries, entertaining quotations and memorable information. There are plenty of colourful tales out there, but Michael Quinion will help you discover the truth that lies behind the cock-and-bull stories.

From the introduction

Over the past ten years, people from all around the world, not all of them by any means with English as a first language, have been asking me about the meaning and history of words in the Questions and Answers section of my online World Wide Words newsletter and Web site.

I’ve been able to answer about 900 of them so far. This book contains revised, corrected, expanded and updated versions of the most popular couple of hundred.

Out of an extraordinarily mixed bag of questions on slang, grammar, vocabulary, word histories and regional usage, I’ve chosen a selection that mainly refer to words and phrases that you’re likely to recognize, no matter which variety of English you’re comfortable with. However, I’ve also included some pieces about quirky phrases (such as up in Annie’s room, behind the clock) that may no longer be living expressions, or even be recognized by anybody who hasn’t been drawing their pensions for a while, but which I hope will intrigue you.

Etymology is an uncertain science and we often have to say ‘we don’t know’ to a question about word origins. But we are at a time of huge advances in the resources available to researchers. Searchable digital archives of newspapers and books have transformed the field in the past decade or so, with discoveries being reported almost every week. Not only did many of the entries in this book have to be updated following their first appearance in the World Wide Words newsletter as a result of new information, but several even had to be revised during its compilation because researchers had found fresh material that altered our understanding of the provenance of terms. New sources of information are being created all the time, with the British Library newspaper archive becoming available as this book began to be compiled and the announcement of a new wave of newspaper digitization by Google as it was completed.

There was a BBC radio series about archaeology many years ago called The Changing Past, a clever title that pointed up the impact of new findings on our understanding of prehistory. The point is just as relevant to etymology and it is a constant delight not only to investigate the stories behind words and phrases and put them within their social and cultural milieu, but also — as a person who has been intrigued with and fascinated by English since a child — to be able at times to provide fresh insight into the way the language has evolved.

Publishing details

[Michael Quinion, Why is Q Always Followed by U? Word-perfect Answers to the Most-asked Questions about Language, published by Penguin Books; hardback, 352pp; UK list price £12.99, ISBN: 978-1-846-14184-3. Paperback, also from Penguin, list price £9.99, ISBN: 978-0-141-03924-4.]


Erstellt: 2021-03

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