Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology, (griech.) etymología, (lat.) etymologia, (esper.) etimologio
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, (esper.) Britujo
Tee, Té, Thé, Té, Tea, (esper.) teo

A

afternoon tea (W3)

Die spezielle "Teatime um 17:00" heißt wohl engl. "afternoon tea", dt. "Nachmittagstee", anscheinend auch "Low Tea" genannt. Die Bezeichnung "five o'clock tea", "Fünf-Uhr-Tee", scheint nicht in englischen Teekannen gebraut worden zu sein.

(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/foods/tea-dance

Tea Dance

The surprisingly subversive history of dancing over "afternoon tea".
...
Yet as "afternoon tea" evolved into an important social occasion in the late 19th century, tea dances’ popularity followed. Tea dances especially enjoyed novelty status in the 1910s, when tango and "tango teas" became a sensation in England. Tea and food were increasingly an afterthought. To parents’ alarm, the focus was on dancing. In response, promoters dodging allegations of debauchery — including concerns that proper young ladies would fall for the charms of gigolos — emphasized elegance. The famous dancer Irene Castle even cautioned dancers against getting too close.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/cafe-on-the-green

Café on the Green

Durham University, Durham, England

Take afternoon tea in a 17th-century almshouse.


(E?)(L?) https://www.duchyofcornwallnursery.co.uk/journal/platinum-jubilee-afternoon-tea-party

Platinum Jubilee Afternoon Tea Party

On Friday 3rd June we held a celebratory Platinum Jubilee Afternoon Tea Party for 100 ticket holders. Here are just a few of the photos from that exceptional event.


(E?)(L?) https://www.foodtimeline.org/teatime.html



...
Afternoon tea

"It is impossible to pinpoint exactly when tea was first served as an afternoon event that took place between midday luncheon and evening dinner. Routines varied greatly between city and country, between classes, and depending on each individual day's activities. But there is no doubt that some time in the late 1830s and early 1840s, the taking of tea in the afternoon developed into a new social event.

Jane Austen hits at is as early as 1804 in an unfinished novel about a family called the Watsons... The accepted tea legend always attributes the 'invention' of "afternoon tea" to Anna Maria, wife of the 7th Duke of Bedford, who wrote to her brother-in-law in a letter sent from Windsor Castle in 1841: 'I forgot to name my old friend Prince Esterhazy who drank tea with me the other evening at 5 o'clock... The Duchess is said to have experienced 'a sinking feeling' in the middle of the afternoon, because of the long gap between luncheon and dinner and so asked her maid to bring her all the necessary tea things and something to eat - probably traditional bread and butter - to her private room in order that she might stave off her hunger pangs...

Georgiana Sitwell wrote quite categorically of the 1830s, 'There was no gathering for five o'clock "afternoon tea" in those days, but most ladies to an hour's rest in their rooms before the six or seven o'clock dinner...

It was not till about 1849 or 50... that "five o'clock tea" in the drawing room was made an institution, and then only in a few fashionable houses where the dinner hour was as late as half past seven or eight o'clock.'...

"Manners of Modern Society", written in 1872, described the way in which "afternoon tea" had gradually become an established event. 'Little Teas', it explained, 'take place in the afternoon' and were so-called because of the small amount of food served and the neatness and elegance of the meal. They were also known as 'Low Teas', because guests were seated in low armchairs with low side-tables on which to place their cups and saucers, 'Handed Teas', since the hostess handed round the cups, and 'Kettledrums', presumably because the kettle was a vital piece of equipment involved in the ceremony. The book continued, 'Now that dinners are so late, and that 'teas proper'... are postponed in consequence to such an unnatural hour as ten p.m.; the want is felt of the old-fashioned meal at five, and so it has been reinstated, though not quite in the same form as before.

Diaries, journals and memoirs from the second half of the century are full of tea ... By the end of the century, "afternoon tea" had crossed all class barriers...'the table was laid ... there were the best things with a fat pink rose on the side of each cup; hearts of lettuce, thin bread and butter, and the crisp little cakes that had been baked in readiness that morning.".'"

"A Social History of Tea", Jane Pettigrew [The National Trust:London] 2001 (p. 102-105) "The growth of business and businesslike habits, steadily justifying the ladies and pressing the dinner-hour farther round the clock, was not well received by the stomach. English internal engines, designed for refueling every four and a half hours, begin to labor when asked to run for six hours at a stretch. Once again wives and mothers took the situation in hand and found the remedy. They invented "Afternoon Tea"... The English, or at least the London, public was first offered tea in 1657, being advised to drink it for medicinal reasons rather than for pleasure... In private, as well as in the public and popular Tea Gardens, millions of people had drunk tea without inventing "afternoon tea". The credit for this innovation has been given to a Duchess of Bedford, and it is true that she seems to have discerned new possibilities in the tea parties held... after dinner; she gave her tea parties earlier and less formally, al fresco. But as an institution in the home, as an occasion not for dressing up and shining but rather for being dull and comfortable by one's own fire, "afternoon tea" had to wait until... successive Chancellors made it practicable and the domestic time-table made it desirable. It was, at first, an affair of the nursery rather than the boudoir, the good mothers' escape from the dilemma of either sending the children straight to be on top of one of Mrs. Beeton's family dinners, or keeping them up past their proper bedtime. "Afternoon tea" provided a meal suitable for children and hour and a half for its digestion."

... Moveable Feasts, Arnold Palmer [Oxford University Press:London] 1952 (p. 97-101)
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.jenreviews.com/best-things-to-do-in-thailand/

65. Sip Afternoon Tea in the Treetops

A treetop treat in the jungle on the Thai island of Koh Kood that gives "high tea" a whole new meaning. Guests are suspended 15ft above the ground on Koh Koodi land in a giant man-made replica of a bird’s nest.


(E?)(L?) https://languagehat.com/2016/06/page/2/

...
You can have tea without tea! Furthermore, “I have been told that many Leftpondians understand "high tea" to mean "olde Englishe posh afternoon tea à la Downton Abbey", and that overpriced hotels and tea shops courting the tourist trade accordingly advertise their afternoon teas as "high tea".” Absolutely true, and that was how I had understood it.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/site-search.html?q=afternoon+tea

afternoon tea (places)


(E?)(L?) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lyme/features/afternoon-tea-at-lyme

Afternoon Tea at Lyme


(E?)(L?) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/charlecote-park/features/book-afternoon-tea

Book afternoon tea at Charlecote Park


(E?)(L?) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/waddesdon-manor/features/afternoon-tea-at-waddesdon

Afternoon Tea at Waddesdon


(E?)(L?) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lists/top-places-for-afternoon-tea

Top places for afternoon tea

This Mother's Day, why not show your mum how special she is by treating her to "afternoon tea" at one of our tea-rooms or cafés? Spend some quality time together whilst enjoying delicate sandwiches, homemade cakes and a delicious cup of tea. And with every treat you buy, you're helping us to look after special places for everyone to enjoy.


(E?)(L?) https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/castle-ward/features/afternoon-tea

Afternoon Tea


(E?)(L?) https://blog.oup.com/2020/10/a-bakers-dozen-and-some-idioms-about-food/

...
"Tea and turn-out": "a light meal after which one was expected to leave the table". In this phrase, "turn-out" means "leave". The old-fashioned people were reluctant to reconcile themselves to the "afternoon tea", a habit that replaced a more substantial meal, and the phrase contained a note of disapproval. Such was the commentary in 1911. The OED found this phrase as early as 1806!
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.the-british-shop.de/Zutaten-fuer-die-englische-Tea-Time

Britische Teekultur: der "Afternoon Tea"

Die "Teatime", also der "Nachmittagstee", ist eine gesellschaftliche Institution, die sich in allen Gesellschaftsschichten Englands seit 1850 fest etabliert hat. Statt ein größeres Mittagessen einzunehmen, trifft man sich am späteren Nachmittag und macht es sich bei einer guten Tasse Tee und einigen herzhaften oder auch süßen Leckereien gemütlich. Traditionell werden englisches Teegebäck und kleine Sandwiches auf einer Etagere serviert: Unten sind die herzhafte Snacks oder Shortbread, die Mitte ist neutral besetzt mit Scones, und ganz oben findet sich dann das süße Gebäck: kleine Kuchen, knusprige Kekse oder leckere Muffins. Bei der klassischen "Tea Time", dem "Cream Tea" werden zu den typischen Scones noch Marmelade und Clotted Cream serviert. Sowohl beim Tee, der natürlich nicht mit Teebeutel sondern losem Tee getrunken wird, als auch bei den süßen Brötchen gibt es zwei Arten auf die der Brite die "Tea Time" genießt. Es gibt Anhänger der beiden Prinzipien "Milk-" oder "Tea-in-First". Früher diente das "Milk-in-First" dem Schutz der zerbrechlichen Porzellantassen. Heute ist das nicht mehr nötig. Dennoch ist der Streit in Großbritannien bis heute nicht beigelegt. Streitfragen gibt es auch zwischen den Grafschaften Devon und Cornwall. Hier geht es um die Reihenfolge beim Bestreichen der Scones mit Clotted Cream und Erdbeermarmelade. In Devonshire werden Scones zuerst mit der Creme und dann mit der Marmelade bestrichen, in Cornwall umgekehrt. Wir finden beide Arten lecker und genießen den "British Tea" ohne uns Gedanken über die Reihenfolge zu machen.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.villeroy-boch.de/dining-lifestyle/unsere-services/wissenswertes/britische-teatime.html

DIE BRITISCHE TEATIME UND IHRE GESCHICHTE
...
Der typische "Afternoon Tea" findet zwischen drei und fünf Uhr am Nachmittag statt, deshalb wird er auch "Five-o-Clock-Tea" genannt. Die Tradition des "Afternoon Tea" geht ebenfalls auf eine Frau zurück: Lady Bedford, Hofdame von Königin Victoria, gilt als seine Erfinderin.

Lady Bedford fühlte sich am späteren Nachmittag häufig etwas unwohl. Zu ihrer Zeit pflegte man mittags nur ein leichtes Mahl einzunehmen, das Abendessen wurde aber erst nach sieben Uhr abends serviert. Zur Stärkung ließ sich Lady Bedford daher nachmittags eine Tasse Tee und einen kleinen Imbiss bringen. Ihren Gästen servierte sie diese Zwischenmahlzeiten im Salon. Dies stieß auf so viel Gegenliebe, dass Lady Bedfords "Afternoon Tea" bald ein beliebtes Event des britischen Adels wurde.
...
"Shortbread": Das süße Mürbeteiggebäck stammt ursprünglich aus Schottland, ist aber im ganzen Vereinigten Königreich sehr populär. Es wird mit viel Butter hergestellt, wodurch das Gebäck seinen vollmundigen Geschmack erhält und gerne zum "Afternoon Tea" gereicht wird.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=afternoon tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "afternoon tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1780 / 1850 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

afternoontea (W3)

(E?)(L?) https://anglizismen.idiotikon.ch/scans/afternoon%20tea/

Afternoontea


a href="http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=afternoontea" target="_blank"> (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=afternoontea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "afternoontea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1870 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

B

breakfast tea (W3)

Der "Breakfast Tea" wird zum Frühstück getrunken.

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=English%20breakfast%20tea

Limericks on "English breakfast tea"

English breakfast tea Raymond likes best.
It's a blended tea, served in the west.
Calls it 'builder's tea', Ray does;
Drinks it first thing each day. "Does
Me good," he says, patting his chest.

"Builder's tea" is an English colloquialism that refers to inexpensive black tea, such as builders and other workmen will drink, usually served in mugs.


(E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/irish-breakfast-tea

Irish-breakfast-tea - A strong blend of black teas, commonly served with milk.


(E?)(L?) https://thesaurus.yourdictionary.com/english-breakfast-tea

English Breakfast Tea - A variety of black Chinese tea


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=breakfast tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "breakfast tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

C

D

E

early morning tea (W3)

Der "Early morning tea" wird im traditionsreichen England noch vor dem Aufstehen getrunken.

(E?)(L?) https://anglizismen.idiotikon.ch/scans/early%20morning%20tea/

early morning tea


(E?)(L?) https://www.lecker.de/teatime-suesse-herzhafte-snacks-zur-teestunde-51697.html

Teatime

Die Briten lieben ihre "Teatime". Der tradtionelle Nachmittagstee ("afternoon tea") zwischen 16 und 17 Uhr ist besonders beliebt. Die Teekultur kennt aber noch weitere Arten der Teatime. Vom "early morning tea" über den "high tea" bis hin zum "royal tea" wird die "Teatime" unterschiedlich zelebriert. Je nach Uhrzeit wird zur Teatime eine mal mehr, mal weniger üppige Auswahl an kleinen köstlichen Snacks gereicht.

Vor allem die tradtionellen Scones mit Clotted Cream dürfen bei der Teatime auf keinen Fall fehlen. Aber auch Shortbread, Früchtekuchen, Crumble, verschieden belegte Sandwiches oder Pie erfreuen sich zur Teatime großer kulinarischer Beliebtheit. Stöbere in unseren Teatime-Leckereien und zelebriere am besten noch heute deine eigene Teestunde. Enjoy your teatime. You will be amused!
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.villeroy-boch.de/dining-lifestyle/unsere-services/wissenswertes/britische-teatime.html

DIE BRITISCHE TEATIME UND IHRE GESCHICHTE

Die "Teatime" ist ein Sinnbild für die englische Genusskultur und auf der ganzen Welt berühmt. Dabei verwenden die Briten den Begriff "Teatime" selbst gar nicht, denn in Großbritannien zelebriert man das Teetrinken zu verschiedenen Tageszeiten: Der "Early Morning Tea" wird noch im Bett genossen, der "Breakfast Tea" zum Frühstück, der "Elevensen" vor dem Mittagessen. Weltweite Berühmtheit hat der "Afternoon Tea" erlangt. Wenn von einer "Teatime" die Rede ist, handelt es sich in aller Regel um diesen traditionellen "Nachmittagstee".

Was ist eine Teatime?
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/rosen_te.htm#tea_time

"Tea Time", Boerner (USA) 1960 Floribunda kupfergold-orange leichter Duft

"Tea Time" ® II, "TANetee", Tantau (DE) 1994 Teehybride, kupfrig-orange kein Duft sehr robust, sehr widerstandsfähig gegen Krankheiten, gute Schnittrose Bronze BUGA Gelsenkirchen 1997

Der Begriff "Teatime" oder "Tea-Time" ist eher außerhalb Großbritanniens gebräuchlich, denn Tee wird dort zu jeder Tageszeit getrunken: der "Early Morning Tea" bereits vor dem Frühstück, oft noch im Bett. Die klassische Zeit für den "Afternoon Tea", den "Nachmittagstee", der in etwa unserer Kaffeezeit entspricht, ist 16 oder 17 Uhr ("Five-o-clock-tea", weil er bis fünf Uhr beendet sein sollte). In großen Hotels wird dieser Tee aber auch häufig noch bis 19 Uhr serviert.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=early morning tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "early morning tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1830 / 1870 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

Elevensen (W3)

Der "Elevensen" (Tea) wird vor dem Mittagessen getrunken, also wohl um 11 Uhr.

(E?)(L?) https://www.villeroy-boch.de/dining-lifestyle/unsere-services/wissenswertes/britische-teatime.html

DIE BRITISCHE TEATIME UND IHRE GESCHICHTE

Die "Teatime" ist ein Sinnbild für die englische Genusskultur und auf der ganzen Welt berühmt. Dabei verwenden die Briten den Begriff "Teatime" selbst gar nicht, denn in Großbritannien zelebriert man das Teetrinken zu verschiedenen Tageszeiten: Der "Early Morning Tea" wird noch im Bett genossen, der "Breakfast Tea" zum Frühstück, der "Elevensen" vor dem Mittagessen. Weltweite Berühmtheit hat der "Afternoon Tea" erlangt. Wenn von einer "Teatime" die Rede ist, handelt es sich in aller Regel um diesen traditionellen "Nachmittagstee".

Was ist eine Teatime?
...


a href="http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Elevensen" target="_blank"> (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Elevensen
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Elevensen" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

F

five o'clock tea (W3)

Die "Teatime", der "Fünf-Uhr-Tee" ("five o'clock tea") wurde im 19. Jahrhundert von der Herzogin von Bedford, 7th Duchess of Bedford (1783–1857) (Hofdame von Königin Victoria), eingeführt. Zu dieser Stunde nahm sie eine kleine Zwischenmahlzeit ein: Sandwiches ohne Rinde, Scones mit clotted cream und Erdbeermarmelade, sowie süße Törtchen.

Die spezielle "Teatime um 17:00" heißt wohl engl. "afternoon tea", dt. "Nachmittagstee", anscheinend auch "Low Tea" genannt. Die Bezeichnung "five o'clock tea", "five-o'clock tea", "five-o-clock-tea", "Fünf-Uhr-Tee", scheint nicht in englischen Teekannen gebraut worden zu sein. Die spezielle "Teatime um 17:00" heißt demnach engl. "afternoon tea", dt. "Nachmittagstee", anscheinend auch "Low Tea" genannt.

(E?)(L?) http://archiv.faustkultur.de/531-0-Stickel-Woerter-und-Unwoerter.html#.Yosglu7P32Q

...
Interessant fand ich bei der Lektüre der alten sprachpflegerischen Schrift, dass neben einer Reihe von Anglizismen, die heute ganz unauffällig in allgemeinem Gebrauch sind wie "Boiler", "Film", "Partner", "Pudding" und "Safe" eine große Anzahl von entlehnten Ausdrücken getadelt werden, die im wilhelminischen Deutschland offensichtlich gern gebraucht wurden, derzeit aber in deutschen Kontexten kaum oder gar nicht mehr vorkommen.

Heutzutage würde man sich schwerlich mit seinen Bekannten zum "Luncheon" oder "Supper" im "Grill-room" verabreden, zu einer "Garden-Party" oder zum "Five o'clock tea" im häuslichen "Drawing-room", um den Kauf von "Shares" zu erörtern.

In Berlin und Dresden scheint dies noch vor hundert Jahren durchaus üblich gewesen zu sein. Solche Ausdrücke sind längst außer Gebrauch geraten wie auch "Havelock", "Ulster", "Ribbon Tie", "Mackintosh", "Fronts", "Knicker-bockers" und "Reefer", die man nicht mehr trägt, die "Dog-carts", "Gigs", "Breaks", "Tilburies" und "Broughams", mit denen kein Mensch mehr fährt, die Tänze "Two step", "Sir Roger" und "Cake walk", die kaum mehr jemand kennt, oder "Hotchpotch" und "Mock-turtel-soup", die man anders als "Rostbeef" und "Rumpsteak" auf hiesigen Speisekarten nicht mehr findet.

Dafür kannten Dunger und seine Zeitgenossen noch keine "Hamburger", "Cheeseburger" und "Hot-dogs", trugen kein "T-Shirt", "Sweat-Shirt", "Dress-Hemd", "Shorts" oder "Jeans", fuhren in ihrer Freizeit weder "Skateboard", "Mountainbike" noch "Inline-Skates" und diskutierten als Geschäftspartner sicher nicht darüber, ob sie das "Recyceln" demnächst "outsorcen" sollten.

Mit dem Kommen und Gehen mancher Sachen und Sachverhalte kommen und gehen offensichtlich auch die Wörter.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.gutenberg.org/files/19392/19392-h/19392-h.htm

...
FIVE-O'CLOCK TEA

There is a fallacy among certain tea-fanciers that the origin of "five-o'clock tea" was due to hygienic demand. These students of the stomach contend that as a tonic and gentle stimulant, when not taken with meat, it is not to be equalled. With meat or any but light food it is considered harmful. Taken between luncheon and dinner it drives away fatigue and acts as a tonic. This is good if true, but it is only a theory, after all. Our theory is that five o'clock in the afternoon is the ladies' leisure hour, and that the taking of tea at that time is an escape from ennui.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.gutenberg.org/files/27709/27709-h/27709-h.htm

Title: Five O'Clock Tea

Farce

Author: W. D. Howells

Release Date: January 5, 2009 [EBook #27709]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
...
Mrs. Somers: "You never can tell about five o'clock tea. There mayn't be more than half a dozen; there may be thirty or forty. But I wished to affect your imagination."
...


(E?)(L?) https://anglizismen.idiotikon.ch/scans/five%20o'clock%20tea/

five o'clock tea


(E?)(L?) https://www.puretea.de/bio-tee-lexikon/f.html

Five o'clock tea

Tee aus der Frühlingsernte, der oftmals einen dünneren Aufguss hat, jedoch einen intensiven, sortentypischen Geschmack.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=five o'clock tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "five o'clock tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1830 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

G

H

handed tea (W3)

(E?)(L?) https://www.foodtimeline.org/teatime.html

...
Afternoon tea
...
"Manners of Modern Society", written in 1872, described the way in which "afternoon tea" had gradually become an established event. The book continued, 'Now that dinners are so late, and that 'teas proper' ... are postponed in consequence to such an unnatural hour as ten p.m.; the want is felt of the old-fashioned meal at five, and so it has been reinstated, though not quite in the same form as before.
...


a href="http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=handed tea" target="_blank"> (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=handed tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "handed tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1850 auf. Erstellt: 2022-05

high tea (W3)

Im Gegensatz zum "Low Tea" der an einem niedrigen Tisch auf niedrigen Sesseln eingenommen wird, wird der "High Tea" an normalen, also hohen Tischen eingenommen. Außerdem wird er später - also einer "höheren Uhrzeit" eingenommen und kann zu einem kompletten Mahl ausarten.

(E?)(L?) https://www.allwords.com/word-high+tea.html

"high tea", noun


(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/banff-teahouse

In the Canadian Rockies, "High Tea" Is Served at 7,000 Feet

Staff hike hundreds of varieties up the slopes.

BY ANNE EWBANK

OCTOBER 4, 2021


(E?)(L?) https://www.bartleby.com/81/8268.html

E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.

"High Tea" (A).

The meal called "tea" served with cold meats, vegetables, and pastry, in substitution of dinner.

“A well-understood "high tea" should have cold roast beef at the top of the table, a cold Yorkshire pie at the bottom, a mighty ham in the middle. The side dishes will comprise soused mackerel, pickled salmon (in due season), sausages and potatoes, etc., etc. Rivers of tea, coffee, and ale, with dry and buttered toast, sally-lunns, scones, muffins, and crumpets, jams and marmalade.”

The Daily Telegraph, May 9th, 1893.


(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/high-tea

"high tea", noun British, a late afternoon or early evening meal similar to a light supper.

ORIGIN OF "HIGH TEA": First recorded in 1825–35


(E?)(L?) https://www.foodtimeline.org/teatime.html

...
"High tea"

British "High Tea" was not a fancier version of "afternoon tea", but a more substantial meal served later in the day, for both sexes. The name was inspired by the actual height of the tables used to serve this meal and a "higher" hour on the clock.

"Traditionally, the upper classes served a "low tea" or "afternoon tea" around 4:00 pm just before the fashionable promenade in Hyde Park, at which one might find small, crust less sandwiches, biscuits, and cake. Middle and lower classes had a "high tea" later in the day, at 5:00 or 6:00. It is a more substantial meal, essentially its dinner. A typical menu at "high tea" would consist of roast pork, stand pie, salmon and salad, trifle, jellies, lemon-cheese tarts, sponge cake, walnut cake, chocolate roll, pound cake, white and brown bread, currant teacake, curd tart and cheeses.

The names derive from the "height of the tables" on which the meals are served. "Low tea" was served not at a dinner table but on tables, which in the United States would be called "coffee tables", in the withdrawing room. "High tea" was served on the dinner table."

In Mrs. Beeton's 1892 edition of her Book of Household Management, she talks not only of "afternoon tea" but also of "high tea": 'in some old-fashioned places, whose inhabitants have not moved with the times ... a "quiet tea" where people are invited to partake of such nice things as hot buttered toast, tea cakes, new-laid eggs, and home-fade preserves and cake'. We do not know exactly when the first "high tea" was eaten. For the working and lower middle classes, it progressed naturally from the fact that tea was served as a standard beverage at mealtimes throughout the day 'Dinner' still book place in the middle of the day. For men there was meat and vegetables, fish, or bread and cheese, depending upon the family budget and the region. In the poorest homes, the women and children made do with tea ... For most poor families, however, there was rarely time for tea in the middle of the afternoon. But a large pot of strong tea sitting in the middle of the meal table amidst cold meats, pies, fried bacon and potatoes, cheese, home-baked bread or oatmeal cakes was a welcome sight at 5.30 or 6pm at the end of the working day. A "high tea" of filling, hearty foods, also known as "meat tea" or "great tea" was exactly what mine and factory workers needed as soon as they arrived home hungry and thirsty from a 10-hour shift. Flora Thompson's Lark Rise to Candleford gives us all the details of a typical working-class "evening tea": 'Here then were the three chief ingredients of the one hot meal a day, bacon from the flitch, vegetables from the garden, and flour for a roly-poly. This meal, called "tea", was taken in the evening, when the men were home from the fields and the children from school, for neither could get home at midday. The meal varied from house to house and for tea at a nearby farm, 'there were fried ham and eggs, cakes and scones and stewed plums and cream, jam and jelly and junket.' ... Even for the very poor, tea with bread provided the evening's nourishment ... "High tea" was not exclusively a working-class meal. It was adopted by all social groups and adapted to their needs. The 1879 edition of Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management explains 'There is Tea and Tea, the substantial family repast in the house of the early dinner, and the afternoon cosy, chatty affairs that late dinners have instituted. The family tea-meal is very like that of breakfast, only that more cakes and knicknackery in the way of sweet eatables are provided. A "High Tea" is where meat takes a prominent part, and signifies really what it is, a tea-dinner ... And there is the mere cup of tea that the lady or ladies of the house take after their afternoon drive as a kind of reviver before dressing for dinner. The "afternoon tea" signifies little more than tea and bread-and-butter, and a few elegant trifles in the way of cake and fruit. The meal is simply to enable a few friends to meet and talk comfortably and quietly ... ' ... Families who employed servants very often took "high tea" on a Sunday in order to allow the maids and butler time to go to church and not worry about cooking an evening meal for the family. Nevertheless, there would be a grand array of sweet and savoury dishes to prepare. For "high tea" in a large country house, Manners of Modern Society recommended 'ripe red strawberries and jugs of rich cream ... cakes of various kinds - plum, rice and sponge ... hot muffins, crumpets, toast, tea-cakes ... The sideboard is the receptacle of the weightier matters, such as cold salmon, pigeon and veal and ham pies, boiled and roast fowls, tongues, ham, veal cake, and should it be a very "hungry tea", roast beef and lamb be may be there for the gentlemen of the party.'"

A Social History of Tea, Jane Pettigrew [The National Trust:London] 2001(p. 110-112)


(E?)(L?) https://anglizismen.idiotikon.ch/scans/high%20tea/

high tea


(E?)(L?) https://languagehat.com/2016/06/page/2/

...
You can have tea without tea! Furthermore, “I have been told that many Leftpondians understand "high tea" to mean "olde Englishe posh afternoon tea à la Downton Abbey", and that overpriced hotels and tea shops courting the tourist trade accordingly advertise their afternoon teas as "high tea".” Absolutely true, and that was how I had understood it.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.online-tee.de/shpPfCnt.php?W=&C=&c=g&CP=&sCI=115

"High tea": Teepause am Abend im familiären Kreis


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW205/page1.html

The low-down on high tea

"Dinner" is, for most English speakers, the main meal of the day. When the word was first used (in the 12th century) it referred to a "midday meal", but it did not remain so for long. By the early 16th century it had become the first meal of the day, what we would call "breakfast". No doubt those 16th century diners had their own reasons for this but it makes perfect sense etymologically as the verb "to dine" comes from the Late Latin "disjejunare", "to breakfast" via the Old French "disner". The Latin word "disjejunare", incidentally, is quite literally "break fast", being "dis" ("undo") + "jejunare" ("to fast") and also gave the French word "déjeuner" "breakfast"*. Obviously, "dinner" could not get any earlier than "breakfast" and after the 16th century it drifted through the day, being served later and later until, during the Victorian era, high society sat down to dinner at 10 p.m. Having one’s main meal of the day at such a late hour meant that many tummies were growling by late afternoon. To avoid that unpleasant hollow feeling, a new meal was invented. It was just a light snack, basically a few cakes and pastries served with the expensive new status symbol, "tea". Consequently, the meal was called "tea".

The name used for this drink tells a lot about how the word entered a language. Like French, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, German, Danish and Swedish ("thé", "te", "tè", "thee", "thee", "te" and "te", respectively) we acquired the name from Malay traders who called it "te", a word they learned from the Amoy dialect of Chinese. The Portuguese, who call it "cha", traded with Chinese who spoke the Mandarin dialect, in which it is called "ch’a". Throughout the Middle East and India, the word is usually "chai" or some variant thereof. This is also the Russian word as "tea" reached Russia overland, via the Silk Road. In India, tea is brewed with milk and a mixture of spices called "chai masala" (Hindi for "tea spice"). This concoction is known as "masala chai" (Hindi, "spiced tea") or simply as "chai". As a result, the word "chai" has now entered the English language and it is not uncommon to see coffee bars offering something called "chai tea" (literally "tea tea").

American "high tea"

Many U.S. tea-shops offer something called "high tea" - usually a fancy affair with varietal teas, crustless cucumber sandwiches and dainty pastries, and a high price. It is our experience that these tea-shops invariably think they are providing an opportunity to sample an English tradition. They are not. This is not to say that the English don’t treat themselves to fine teas, crumpets and scones - far from it. But when they do they don’t call it "high tea". In England "high tea" is a distinctly working-class expression which is used in the North of England to mean "dinner" and is synonymous with "meat tea" - tea with which meat is served. "High tea" is the main, cooked meal of the day, served in the early evening. Thus, fish and chips would qualify as "high tea" whether or not a pot of tea appears on the table. We would like to introduce Americans to the term "cream tea", which is what the British call tea served with crumpets, muffins, scones, jam and clotted cream, though the earliest recorded instance of this term comes from only 1964, at least so far!

But what about all those crumpets, muffins and scones? A "crumpet" is a round, flat bread with many holes on its upper surface. The word "crumpet" first appears in the 14th century in the expression a "crompid cake". "Crompid" here means "curled up" (just like "cruller", by the way) which suggests that the original "crompids" were somewhat different from our "crumpets". In the Midlands and West of England you might hear "crumpets" called "pikelets". This is one of the very few instances of the English language borrowing a word from Welsh. The original is "bara pyglyd" (Welsh for "pitchy bread", presumably from its color). The origin of "muffin" is not nearly as clear-cut but it is believed to be related to the Old French "moufflet", "soft". In recent years, "scones" have become popular in the U.S. though they have rapidly diverged from their English origins. Large, triangular and filled with fruit, they are a far cry from the small, round plain scones which demand to be slathered with Devonshire clotted cream and jam. Also, the American version of the "scone" rhymes with "bone" whereas the English kind (usually) rhymes with "gone". The word "scone" is believed to be an abbreviation of the Middle Dutch "schoonbrot" or the Middle Low German "schonbrot", both of which mean "fine bread".

Well, we have to dash now, it’s almost "tea-time". But just when is that, exactly? In case you think this question is too easy, we should point out that in Jamaica "tea" is the name given to "breakfast".

*"Jejunare" also gave us "jejunum", the "fasting" portion of the gut, so named as digested material does not remain there. "Jejune" comes from the Latin verb, also, and originally had the meaning, in English, of "without food", "fasting", "hungry" (early 17th c.), and then "undernourished" (mid-17th c.), but there was also "unsatisfying", "poor", "barren" (early 17th c.), and then "puerile", "childish" (19th c.; this meaning is thought to derive from the misconception that "jejune" is related to French "jeune" = "young").


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue095.html

...
Why "high"? The word simply indicates the tea is somewhat more important than usual, as in "High street" and "high mass".


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_(meal)#Evening_high_tea

...
Tea (in reference to food, rather than the drink) has long been used as an umbrella term for several different meals. English writer Isabella Beeton, whose books on home economics were widely read in the 19th century, describes meals of various kinds and provides menus for the "old-fashioned tea", the "at-home tea", the "family tea", and the "high tea".
...
Evening high tea

"High tea" is an evening meal, sometimes associated with the working class but in reality enjoyed by all social classes, in particular after sports matches, especially cricket. It is typically eaten between 5 pm and 7 pm. This was also sometimes called a "meat-tea" in the past.

In most of the United Kingdom (namely, the North of England, North and South Wales, the English Midlands, Scotland, and some rural and working class areas of Northern Ireland), people traditionally call their midday meal "dinner" and their evening meal "tea" (served around 6 pm), whereas the upper social classes would call the midday meal "lunch" or "luncheon" and the evening meal (served after 7 pm) "dinner" (if formal) or "supper" (if informal). This differentiation in usage is one of the classic social markers of British English (see U and non-U English). However, in most of the South of England, the midday meal is "lunch", with "dinner" being the evening meal, regardless of social class.

"High tea" typically consists of a savoury dish (either something hot, or cold cuts of meat such as ham salad), followed by cakes and bread, butter and jam. In The Cambridge Social History of Britain, 1750–1950, "high tea" is defined thus:

the central feature was the extension of a meal based predominantly on bread, butter and tea by the inclusion of some kind of fish or meat usually cooked in a frying pan.

A stereotypical expression "You'll have had your tea", meaning "I imagine you have already eaten", is used to parody people from Edinburgh as being rather stingy with hospitality. A BBC Radio 4 comedy series of this name was made by Graeme Garden and Barry Cryer.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=high tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "high tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1810 / 1860 auf. Erstellt: 2022-05

I

J

K

kettledrum (W3)


"Kettledrum" als Farbe: - #712f26 - Kettledrum



Als engl. "Kettledrum" (wörtlich dt. "Kesselpauke"), wird eine sehr spät beginnende Tanzgesellschaft bezeichnet - wohl aber auch eine kurze Teepause mit wenig Beilage.

(E?)(L?) https://www.allwords.com/word-kettledrum.html

"kettledrum", noun, a large hemispherical brass percussion instrument (one of the timpani) with a drumhead that can be tuned by adjusting its tension


(E?)(L?) https://www.bartleby.com/81/9503.html

E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.

"Kettledrum"

A large social party, originally applied to a military party in India, where "drum-heads" served for tables. On Tweedside it signifies a “social party”, met together to take tea from the same tea-kettle. (See DRUM, HURRICANE.) 1

"Kettledrum", a drum in the shape of a kiddle or fish-basket.


(E?)(L?) https://www.bartleby.com/81/9504.html

"Kettledrummle" (Gabriel.)

A Covenanter preacher in Sir Walter Scott’s Old Mortality.


(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/kettledrum

"kettledrum"

a drum consisting of a hollow hemisphere of brass, copper, or fiberglass over which is stretched a skin, the tension of which can be modified by hand screws or foot pedals to vary the pitch.

ORIGIN OF KETTLEDRUM

First recorded in 1595–1605; "kettle" + "drum"


(E?)(L?) https://www.foodtimeline.org/teatime.html

...
Afternoon tea
...
"Manners of Modern Society", written in 1872, described the way in which "afternoon tea" had gradually become an established event. 'Little Teas', it explained, 'take place in the afternoon' and were so-called because of the small amount of food served and the neatness and elegance of the meal. They were also known as 'Low Teas', because guests were seated in low armchairs with low side-tables on which to place their cups and saucers, 'Handed Teas', since the hostess handed round the cups, and 'Kettledrums', presumably because the kettle was a vital piece of equipment involved in the ceremony. The book continued, 'Now that dinners are so late, and that 'teas proper'... are postponed in consequence to such an unnatural hour as ten p.m.; the want is felt of the old-fashioned meal at five, and so it has been reinstated, though not quite in the same form as before.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/5402/pg5402.html

"KETTLEDRUMS". Cupid's kettle drums; a woman's breasts, called by sailors chest and bedding.


(E?)(L?) https://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/o/?i=788081

Shakespeare concordance: all instances of "kettledrums"

Hamlet (1)


(E?)(L?) https://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?m=200805&paged=4

Kettledrum(s) and creaking ham

May 14, 2008 @ 10:52 am· Filed by Geoffrey K. Pullum under Lost in translation
...
Indeed, yesterday I was in a hotel in La Coruña, a bustling port city of northern Spain, and I found that the room service menu offered, among other things, "Kettledrum" of potatoes with broken eggs and creaking ham. I'll leave comments open below for people to try their hand at figuring out from Spanish/English dictionaries how this little translinguistic catastrophe could have happened. ("Creaking" was not a typo; "creaking pizza" was also on the menu.) It might be charged that there is much less excuse for such zany mangling of English in the case of a port city across the Bay of Biscay from England: La Coruña is just 90 minutes' flight time from Heathrow, and hundreds or thousands of native speakers of English come through every week.

All a hotel manager would have to do would be to sit down with one guest for five minutes to learn that a "kettledrum" is a poor choice of cooking utensil, and that the (utterly delicious) ham of northern Spain does not creak any more than pizza does.
...


(E?)(L?) https://woerterbuchnetz.de/?sigle=Meyers#1

"Kettledrum" (engl., »Kesselpauke«), sehr spät beginnende Tanzgesellschaft.


(E?)(L?) http://www.word-detective.com/011405.html#pinktea%20kettledrum

Next time, try the sloe gin.

Dear Word Detective: I wonder why people use "pink tea" or "kettledrum" to refer to a "tea gathering in the afternoon". I have never seen any kind of tea with the color of pink, and I have never heard the sound of a "kettledrum" on such occasion. -- Lilian, Beijing, China.
...
"Kettledrum" also dates back to the 19th century, this time in England, and seems to be a derivative of the older (mid-18th century) colloquial term "drum", meaning a fashionable party or gathering at a private house. The use of "drum" in this "party" sense may, as one account at the time notes, refer to the loud noise of such a gathering, much as other sorts of gatherings ranging in size and frenzy were known as a "squeeze", fuss", "rout", "racquet" and "hurricane". It's worth noting, however, that "drum" at the time was also underworld slang for "street" or "house", drawn from the Romany (Gypsy) word "drom" ("street").

In any case, "kettledrum" in the tea party sense is a sort of pun on "drum", as it is a "drum" of a smaller sort that involves a tea kettle. Not exactly a knee-slapper, I'll admit, but it probably seemed a lot funnier 150 years ago.


(E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/kettledrum

"Kettledrum" definition


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=kettledrum
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "kettledrum" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1720 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

L

little tea (W3)

Der "Little Tea" wird nachmittags mit wenig fester Beilage serviert.

(E?)(L?) https://www.foodtimeline.org/teatime.html

...
Afternoon tea
...
"Manners of Modern Society", written in 1872, described the way in which "afternoon tea" had gradually become an established event. 'Little Teas', it explained, 'take place in the afternoon' and were so-called because of the small amount of food served and the neatness and elegance of the meal. They were also known as 'Low Teas', because guests were seated in low armchairs with low side-tables on which to place their cups and saucers, 'Handed Teas', since the hostess handed round the cups, and 'Kettledrums', presumably because the kettle was a vital piece of equipment involved in the ceremony. The book continued, 'Now that dinners are so late, and that 'teas proper'... are postponed in consequence to such an unnatural hour as ten p.m.; the want is felt of the old-fashioned meal at five, and so it has been reinstated, though not quite in the same form as before.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/19392

The Little Tea Book

by Arthur Gray and George Hood

Contents


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=little tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "little tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1750 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

low tea (W3)

Der "Low Tea" wird nachmittags an einem niedrigen Tischchen eingenommen.

(E?)(L?) https://www.foodtimeline.org/teatime.html

...
Afternoon tea
...
"Manners of Modern Society", written in 1872, described the way in which "afternoon tea" had gradually become an established event. 'Little Teas', it explained, 'take place in the afternoon' and were so-called because of the small amount of food served and the neatness and elegance of the meal. They were also known as 'Low Teas', because guests were seated in low armchairs with low side-tables on which to place their cups and saucers, 'Handed Teas', since the hostess handed round the cups, and 'Kettledrums', presumably because the kettle was a vital piece of equipment involved in the ceremony. The book continued, 'Now that dinners are so late, and that 'teas proper'... are postponed in consequence to such an unnatural hour as ten p.m.; the want is felt of the old-fashioned meal at five, and so it has been reinstated, though not quite in the same form as before.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.london.de/ausgehtipps/teatime/

Teatime
...
Der "Afternoon Tea" war geboren. Er wird in Großbritannien bis heute zelebriert und ist auch unter dem Begriff "Low Tea" bekannt, weil er traditionell im Salon an einem niedrigen Teetisch eingenommen wurde. Er wird zwischen 16:00 Uhr und 17:00 Uhr (in manchen Häusern auch früher) serviert und ist eine komplette Zwischenmahlzeit. Allein schon aus Zeitgründen wird er in vielen britischen Familien nur am Wochenende zelebriert. Es gilt jedoch als sehr chic, sich zum "Afternoon Tea" in einem renommierten Hotel zu treffen.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=low tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "low tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1780 / 1850 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

M

N

O

P

Q

R

royal tea (W3)

Die "Teatime", der "Fünf-Uhr-Tee" ("five o'clock tea") wurde im 19. Jahrhundert von der Herzogin von Bedford, 7th Duchess of Bedford (1783–1857) (Hofdame von Königin Victoria), eingeführt. Zu dieser Stunde nahm sie eine kleine Zwischenmahlzeit ein: Sandwiches ohne Rinde, Scones mit clotted cream und Erdbeermarmelade, sowie süße Törtchen.

Allerding gibt es bereits erste Hinweise auf die Bezeichnung "tea time", "teatime" aus den Jahren 1750 – 1760. Wahrscheinlich wurde sie anfangs nicht vornehm zelebriert und / oder nicht um 17h zelebriert.

Bis gestern war für mich engl. "tea time", "teatime" = dt. "Teezeit" und die ist Nachmittags um 17:00h - vielleicht noch von 15:00h bis 17:00h. Nachdem ich nun etwas danach gesucht habe, bin ich mir nun sehr unsicher, was die verschiedenen Bezeichnungen genau bedeuten. Die "teatime" scheint eher eine Bezeichnung von Uneingeweihten zu sein. Für die Engländer / Briten scheint immer "teatime" zu sein. Die spezielle "Teatime um 17:00" heißt demnach engl. "afternoon tea", dt. "Nachmittagstee", anscheinend auch "Low Tea" genannt. Die Bezeichnung "five o'clock tea", "Fünf-Uhr-Tee", scheint nicht in englischen Teekannen gebraut worden zu sein.

Neben diesen Bezeichnungen findet man aber auch noch weitere Teatime-Angaben, wie "breakfast tea", "early morning tea", "Elevensen", "high tea", "royal tea".

(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=royal tea
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "royal tea" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1770 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

S

T

tea time (W3)


"Tea Time" als Farbe: - #945d0b - Tea Time



Die "Teatime", der "Fünf-Uhr-Tee" ("five o'clock tea") wurde im 19. Jahrhundert von der Herzogin von Bedford, 7th Duchess of Bedford (1783–1857) (Hofdame von Königin Victoria), eingeführt. Zu dieser Stunde nahm sie eine kleine Zwischenmahlzeit ein: Sandwiches ohne Rinde, Scones mit clotted cream und Erdbeermarmelade, sowie süße Törtchen.

Allerding gibt es bereits erste Hinweise auf die Bezeichnung "tea time", "teatime" aus den Jahren 1750 – 1760. Wahrscheinlich wurde sie anfangs nicht vornehm zelebriert und / oder nicht um 17h zelebriert.

Bis gestern war für mich engl. "tea time", "teatime" = dt. "Teezeit" und die ist Nachmittags um 17:00h - vielleicht noch von 15:00h bis 17:00h. Nachdem ich nun etwas danach gesucht habe, bin ich mir nun sehr unsicher, was die verschiedenen Bezeichnungen genau bedeuten. Die "teatime" scheint eher eine Bezeichnung von Uneingeweihten zu sein. Für die Engländer / Briten scheint immer "teatime" zu sein. Die spezielle "Teatime um 17:00" heißt demnach engl. "afternoon tea", dt. "Nachmittagstee", anscheinend auch "Low Tea" genannt. Die Bezeichnung "five o'clock tea", "Fünf-Uhr-Tee", scheint nicht in englischen Teekannen gebraut worden zu sein.

Neben diesen Bezeichnungen findet man aber auch noch weitere Teatime-Angaben, wie "breakfast tea", "early morning tea", "Elevensen", "high tea", "royal tea".

(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-is-la-once

How Chileans Turned British Tea Time Into a ‘Fourth Meal’

You might want to try it, too.

BY MARK JOHANSON

MAY 14, 2020


(E?)(L?) https://www.england.de/grossbritannien/tea-time

Tea Time

Die englische "Tea Time" - nichts könnte britischer sein! Die Teekultur der Insel ist in der ganzen Welt legendär und das, obwohl in England, Schottland und Wales gar kein Tee angebaut wird. Bei dem Wort "Tea Time" hat jeder von uns ein Bild vor dem geistigen Auge: Pünktlich um fünf Uhr nachmittags, so glaubt man, steht auf der Insel das Leben still und die Briten setzen sich zu einer gepflegten Tasse englischem Tee mit einem leichten Snack, etwa dem königlichen Gurkensandwich, nieder.

Dieses Bild ist heute kaum mehr als koloniale Nostalgie und erinnert an eine Zeit im späten 17. Jahrhundert, als die Briten zwar Tee aus Indien importierten, er aber so teuer war, dass er nur den Wohlbetuchtesten des Landes vorbehalten war. Und doch hat sich das Bild bis heute als zentrales Element des britischen Lebensstils gehalten. Für die Damen aus gutem Hause, die ihre Tage bei Stickarbeiten, Spaziergängen und der Organisation von gesellschaftlichen Großereignissen verbrachten, war der "Nachmittagstee" ein angenehmer Anlass sich zu treffen und eine Gelegenheit, die langen Stunden (und den Magen) bis zum Dinner zu füllen.

Aus dieser Zeit stammt auch die rituelle Teezeremonie, der Legende nach erfunden von Lady Bedford im Jahr 1840. Jedes Treffen zur Tea Time war ein kleines gesellschaftliches Ereignis, das mit dem gebührenden Tamtam gewürdigt werden musste. Wer etwas auf sich hielt, lud die feinen Damen der Gesellschaft zum Tee zu sich ein – und wurde (mit etwas Glück) dann ebenfalls von ihnen eingeladen. Bei solchen Anlässen kamen dann edle Tischdecken, Silberkannen und nur das beste Porzellan auf den Tisch.

Die Zubereitung des legendären „five o’clock teas“ oblag dann ganz allein der Hausherrin. Die Dienerschaft trug zur "Tea Time" alles Notwendige dafür zusammen und die Dame des Hauses setzte vor aller Augen den Tee an. Damit war die Tea Time eröffnet. Die Bezeichnung "five o’clock tea" ist übrigens keine britische Erfindung und im anglosächsischen Raum kaum bekannt oder gebräuchlich.

Wer danach fragt, wird deshalb mitunter verständnislose Blicke ernten. Das, was wir unter diesem Begriff verstehen, kennt man in England als "afternoon tea".
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.europeana.eu/de/galleries/tea-time

GALERIEN

Tea time

How do you take your tea? Served in an elegant parlour, from a flask or during a Japanese ceremony? Since the 1840s, sitting down for a steamy cup of joy has become part of daily life all over the world.


(E?)(L?) https://www.foodtimeline.org/teatime.html

...
English tea time

Food historians generally credit Anna, the Duchess of Bedford, for popularizing "afternoon tea" in the 1830s. Primary sources reveal this English meal was a byproduct of social economy. As the Industrial Revolution flipped the main meal of the day from noonish to evening, the opportunity for a light, late afternoon repast presented itself. For the English, "Afternoon Tea" was the perfect answer. Victorian-era teas assumed many forms, according to purpose. Ranging from informal feminine gatherings to elaborate ornate events attended by hundreds, this versatile meal played a unique role in British life, enjoyed throughout the Empire. Our research indicates classic English "tea" was not popular in the USA until the last quarter of the 19th century. Americans embraced coffee as a way forge national beverage identity seperate from England.
...
[1935]

"Tea Time, The Peace Time. Before the advent of prohibition turned a temperate people into quite the opposite, there came a time of daily peace, and our busy affairs, for a moment, stood still. At restaurants and in our homes friends gathered together about four o'clock. Of all home functions none is more restful and uplifting than this hour of relaxation ... The tea hour makes up to us all that is lacking during the rest of the day and night ... Every detail of the tea service should express perfection. The silver should gleam and the linen should be spotless, for these speak of the carefully directed home. Everything should proclaim daintiness, and for this special meal the finest, the prettiest, china should be used. An old-fashioned cake basket lends a certain stately dignity to the tea table and a finely etched or cut glass plate is lovely for sandwiches. The maid must be dressed by tea time, as for dinner, and her immaculate linen must be second only to the immaculate tray cloth or tablecloth and the tiny doilies. Tea has been supplanted more or less by cocktails and, while the cocktail party is often carried out in beautiful detail, its uprorious gayety adds to, rather than takes away from, our nervous restlessness. My attitude is mid-Victorian I know: I still love "afternoon tea". So let us find ways and means of adding to the heavenly refreshment of tea for two, or four, or more, at four or five o'clock ... if you want cream, it must be rich ... But it is the sandwiches, the canapes, the tiny cakes, dainty nothings all fo them but all essential, that give the real joy to the tea table. It is the part of wisdome to avoild the allurements of the tea table if one is on a diet or is attempting to maintian or regain her 'girlish figure', for tea table sandwiches tempt the strongest..."

---Alice Foote MacDougall's Cook BBook, Alice Foote MacDougall [Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Company:Boston] 1935 (p. 219-221)
...
When & where were the teabags introduced?

Our survey of historic newspapers confirms the practice of brewing loose tea in cheese cloth tea existed in the late 19th century. This was done at home; not a packaged commercial product. The generally accepted, oft repeated, story credits Thomas Sullivan, a New York businessman, for 'accidentally' inventing "tea bags" in 1908. The story is fun. But? Like many food legends, it relies on hearsay published long after the "fact". The earliest reference we find "documenting" the Sulllivan story was published in 1945. If you have earlier documented/pring references please let us know. It is interesting to note that the term “tea bag” can also mean a bag of loose tea and a woman's clutch (small purse) to be used at "tea time".
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=tea time
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "tea time" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1780 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

Tea Time - Rose


00 Hinweis: ----------------------------------- Hinweis: --------------------------------------------------------------
01 Hinweis: Bild Platzhalter
02 Hinweis: Bemerkung
03 Hinweis: Literatur
10 Name: -------------------------------------- Name: -----------------------------------------------------------------
11 Name: Sortier Name TANetee
12 Name: Exhibition Name
13 Name: Registration Name
14 Name: Synonyme Tea Time
15 Name: Auszeichnungen / Awards empfehlenswerte Edelrose der ADR®-Sichtungen, 1997 und 1998 Rosenkönigin der Blumeninsel Mainau
20 Genealogie: -------------------------------- Genealogie: -----------------------------------------------------------
21 Genealogie: Gattung / Sektion / Art Tee-Hybride, Edelrose
22 Genealogie: Elternrosen / Herkunft / Parentage
23 Genealogie: Kinderrosen / Nachkommen
24 Genealogie: Sports / Mutationen
25 Genealogie: Verwendung / Utilisation / Gebruik / Use Garten und Kübel, Schnittrose, Beete, kleine Gruppen, Liebhaberpflanze
26 Genealogie: Erscheinungsjahr / DOB (Date of Birth) 1994
27 Genealogie: Züchter / Entdecker / Breeder / Hybridizer Tantau Rosen 1994
30 Blüte: ------------------------------------- Blüte: ----------------------------------------------------------------
31 Blüte: Farbe / Bloemkleur / Flower Colour kupfer-goldorange bis hellorangerosé, Grund gelb
32 Blüte: Duft / Fragrance / Geurend / Scent Strength zarter Duft
33 Blüte: Eigenschaften / Flowering Habit öfterblühend, mehrjährig, Haltbarkeit der Blüten ist sehr gut
34 Blüte: Blütenblätter-Anzahl / Petals
35 Blüte: Form / Forme de la fleur / Bloom Shape gut gefüllt
36 Blüte: Größe / Bloem / Bloom Size Ø 8-10 cm
37 Blüte: Typ / Bloom Type
38 Blüte: Zeit / Floraison / Bloeitijd / Flowering Period Mai - Okt
39 Blüte: Bienenfreundlichkeit
40 Pflanze: ----------------------------------- Pflanze: --------------------------------------------------------------
41 Pflanze: Blätter, Laub / Feuillage / Foliage mittelgrün, mittelgroß, grün, gute Blattgesundheit, glänzend
42 Pflanze: Dornen / Stacheln / Thornyness
43 Pflanze: Hagebutten / Hips / Hip Colour / Hip Shape
44 Pflanze: Knospen / Buds
45 Pflanze: Stiele / Stems kräftige Stiele
50 Wuchs: ------------------------------------- Wuchs: ----------------------------------------------------------------
51 Wuchs: Form / Vorm / Growth Habit buschig und aufrecht, wächst sehr gleichmäßig
52 Wuchs: Abstand / Dist. de plantation
53 Wuchs: Höhe / Taille / Height / Hauteur 70-90 cm
54 Wuchs: Weite / Width 80 cm
60 Gesundheit: -------------------------------- Gesundheit: -----------------------------------------------------------
61 Gesundheit: Bodenansprüche / Cultivation durchlässig, humusreich, nährstoffreich
62 Gesundheit: Bakterien, Pilze, Viren Mehltau, Sternrußtau
63 Gesundheit: Tierische Schädlinge
64 Gesundheit: Hitze gedeiht am besten in der vollen Sonne
65 Gesundheit: Kälte winterhart
66 Gesundheit: Nässe
67 Gesundheit: Trockenheit
68 Gesundheit: Schatten Sonne bis Halbschatten
99 -------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------



(E?)(L?) https://www.agel-rosen.de/rose/1658-tea-time-kaufen/

Tea Time ®

Edelrose / Moderner Teehybrid


(E?)(L?) https://www.baumschule-horstmann.de/shop/exec/product/77/5988/Edelrose-Tea-Time.html

Edelrose 'Tea Time' ®


(E?)(L?) https://datenbank.europa-rosarium.de/genbank.php

Tea Time (Rosen Tantau 1994)

Genbank: ERS-6819-7232 (7287), Europa-Rosarium der Stadt Sangerhausen, Standort M:Rm/4a:8


(E?)(L?) https://www.garten-schlueter.de/rosen/edelrosen/edelrose-tea-time

Edelrose 'Tea Time®'


(E?)(L?) https://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.27939

...
Bred by Hans Jürgen Evers (1940-2007) (Germany, 1994).

Introduced in Germany by Rosen-Tantau/Tantau Roses in 1994 as 'Tea Time'.
...


(E?)(L?) https://shop.rosen-huber.ch/Rosen/180313.html

Rosa (Teehybride) 'Tea Time'®


(E?)(L?) https://www.rosenpark-draeger.de/Tea-Time/WN-BU-A-0523

TEA TIME ®


(E?)(L?) https://www.rosen-tantau.com/rose-tea-time/
Es gibt auch eine Rose mit der Bezeichnung "Tea Time".


Tea Time®


(E?)(L?) http://www.rosen-zundel.de/sortiment.php

Tea Time ®


(E?)(L?) https://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/rosen_te.htm#tea_time

"Tea Time", Boerner (USA) 1960 Floribunda kupfergold-orange leichter Duft

"Tea Time" ® II, "TANetee", Tantau (DE) 1994 Teehybride, kupfrig-orange kein Duft sehr robust, sehr widerstandsfähig gegen Krankheiten, gute Schnittrose Bronze BUGA Gelsenkirchen 1997

Der Begriff "Teatime" oder "Tea-Time" ist eher außerhalb Großbritanniens gebräuchlich, denn Tee wird dort zu jeder Tageszeit getrunken: der "Early Morning Tea" bereits vor dem Frühstück, oft noch im Bett. Die klassische Zeit für den "Afternoon Tea", den "Nachmittagstee", der in etwa unserer Kaffeezeit entspricht, ist 16 oder 17 Uhr ("Five-o-clock-tea", weil er bis fünf Uhr beendet sein sollte). In großen Hotels wird dieser Tee aber auch häufig noch bis 19 Uhr serviert.


(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_von_Rosensorten

'Tea Time', Tantau, 1994


Erstellt: 2022-05

Teatime (W3)

Die "Teatime", der "Fünf-Uhr-Tee" ("five o'clock tea") wurde im 19. Jahrhundert von der Herzogin von Bedford, 7th Duchess of Bedford (1783–1857) (Hofdame von Königin Victoria), eingeführt. Zu dieser Stunde nahm sie eine kleine Zwischenmahlzeit ein: Sandwiches ohne Rinde, Scones mit clotted cream und Erdbeermarmelade, sowie süße Törtchen.

Allerding gibt es bereits erste Hinweise auf die Bezeichnung "tea time", "teatime" aus den Jahren 1750 – 1760. Wahrscheinlich wurde sie anfangs nicht vornehm zelebriert und / oder nicht um 17h zelebriert.

Bis gestern war für mich engl. "tea time", "teatime" = dt. "Teezeit" und die ist Nachmittags um 17:00h - vielleicht noch von 15:00h bis 17:00h. Nachdem ich nun etwas danach gesucht habe, bin ich mir nun sehr unsicher, was die verschiedenen Bezeichnungen genau bedeuten. Die "teatime" scheint eher eine Bezeichnung von Uneingeweihten zu sein. Für die Engländer / Briten scheint immer "teatime" zu sein. Die spezielle "Teatime um 17:00" heißt demnach engl. "afternoon tea", dt. "Nachmittagstee", anscheinend auch "Low Tea" genannt. Die Bezeichnung "five o'clock tea", "Fünf-Uhr-Tee", scheint nicht in englischen Teekannen gebraut worden zu sein.

Neben diesen Bezeichnungen findet man aber auch noch weitere Teatime-Angaben, wie "breakfast tea", "early morning tea", "Elevensen", "high tea", "royal tea".

(E?)(L?) https://www.allwords.com/word-teatime.html

"teatime", noun - (context, mostly, UK) the traditional time, in the late afternoon, for serving tea (the meal)


(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/historic-gardening-tools

How England Got Its Curvy Cucumbers Straightened Out

The cucumber straightener was a marvel of British horticulture.
...
It wasn’t until the iconic "cucumber sandwich" became popular among Queen Victoria’s family that the produce began to gain prestige. Subsequently, the delicate sandwich became an iconic "teatime snack" in British high society, and the cucumber, suddenly, was in vogue. To ensure the fruit could be slipped easily between slices of bread, it needed to be sliced thinly and evenly. Which called for a straighter cucumber.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/foods/sonderjyske-kaffebord-southern-jutland-coffee-table

Southern Jutland Coffee Table

These cake-laden tables fueled community meetings that helped bring Southern Jutland back into Denmark.
...
In Denmark, coffee gatherings are like what the British call "teatime".
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/meinong-i-chan

MeiNong I-Chan

Meinong District, Taiwan

Hakka-style teahouse where everybody grinds their own tea.

IT’S TEATIME, AND AT THIS Hakka-style teahouse, guests make lei cha from scratch.


(E?)(L?) https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/sabirs-chaikhana

Sabir’s Chaikhana

Tbilisi, Georgia

The last standing example of an ancient district's teatime tradition.


(E?)(L?) https://pdodswr-a.akamaihd.net/swr/swr-fernsehen/natuerlich/931841.l.mp4

ARD - natürlich! Teatime im deutschen Südwesten - 11.04.2017


(E?)(L?) http://cdn-storage.br.de/MUJIuUOVBwQIbtC2uKJDM6OhuLnC_2rc9U1S/_AJS/_A8g_-xG_71S/0c1798cb-7282-4c87-abeb-745f552b494a_C.mp4

ARD - Kunst + Krempel - It's Teatime! - 05.01.2019


(E?)(L?) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/teatime

ORIGIN OF "TEATIME": First recorded in 1750–60; "tea" + "time"


(E?)(L?) https://landhaus-ettenbuehl.de/restaurant-cafe/original-classic-english-teatime-cream-tea/

Kleine Geschichte der Teatime

Als Mitte des 17. Jahrhunderts begonnen wurde, Tee zu importieren, war er so teuer, dass er nur für die Oberschicht erschwinglich war und als Statussymbol galt. Queen Anne (1665-1714) förderte die Popularität des Teetrinkens, in dem sie zum Frühstück statt des üblichen Warmbiers lieber Tee trank. Nach 1750 wurden die ersten "Teegärten" ("tea gardens") eröffnet, in denen Tee im Freien getrunken wurde. Erst als 1783 die hohen Teesteuern gesenkt wurden, konnte sich die Mittelschicht, die bis dahin Kaffee oder Bier getrunken hatte, auch den viel begehrten Tee leisten.

Die Tradition des "Fünf-Uhr-Tees" ("five o´clock tea") ist im 19. Jahrhundert auf die Herzogin von Bedford zurückzuführen, die zu dieser Stunde gern eine kleine Zwischenmahlzeit einnahm: elegante Sandwiches ohne Rinde, Scones mit clotted cream und Erdbeermarmelade, sowie süße Törtchen wurden damals und werden bis heute serviert. Open Sandwiches, also nicht zusammengeklappt, sind wesentlich edler als die gedeckten und auch Queen Mum nahm nur diese zu sich.


(E?)(L?) https://www.lecker.de/teatime-suesse-herzhafte-snacks-zur-teestunde-51697.html

Teatime

Die Briten lieben ihre "Teatime". Der tradtionelle Nachmittagstee ("afternoon tea") zwischen 16 und 17 Uhr ist besonders beliebt. Die Teekultur kennt aber noch weitere Arten der Teatime. Vom "early morning tea" über den "high tea" bis hin zum "royal tea" wird die "Teatime" unterschiedlich zelebriert. Je nach Uhrzeit wird zur Teatime eine mal mehr, mal weniger üppige Auswahl an kleinen köstlichen Snacks gereicht.

Vor allem die tradtionellen Scones mit Clotted Cream dürfen bei der Teatime auf keinen Fall fehlen. Aber auch Shortbread, Früchtekuchen, Crumble, verschieden belegte Sandwiches oder Pie erfreuen sich zur Teatime großer kulinarischer Beliebtheit. Stöbere in unseren Teatime-Leckereien und zelebriere am besten noch heute deine eigene Teestunde. Enjoy your teatime. You will be amused!
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.london.de/ausgehtipps/teatime/

Teatime

Der Legende nach verdanken die Engländer die Einführung des "Afternoon Tea" (der Begriff "Tea Time" wird eigentlich nur außerhalb Großbritanniens verwendet, denn in der UK wird zu jeder Tageszeit Tee getrunken) Anna, der 7. Duchess of Bedford, im frühen 19. Jahrhundert: Die Gräfin verspürte regelmäßig Hungergefühle zwischen Mittag- und Abendessen und ließ sich am Nachmittag einen kleinen Imbiss aus süßem Gebäck und herzhaften Sandwiches in ihrem Boudoir servieren.

Der "Afternoon Tea" war geboren. Er wird in Großbritannien bis heute zelebriert und ist auch unter dem Begriff "Low Tea" bekannt, weil er traditionell im Salon an einem niedrigen Teetisch eingenommen wurde. Er wird zwischen 16:00 Uhr und 17:00 Uhr (in manchen Häusern auch früher) serviert und ist eine komplette Zwischenmahlzeit. Allein schon aus Zeitgründen wird er in vielen britischen Familien nur am Wochenende zelebriert. Es gilt jedoch als sehr chic, sich zum "Afternoon Tea" in einem renommierten Hotel zu treffen.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.processlibrary.com/de/directory/files/teatimer/25451/
Auch im Umfeld von "Windows" taucht "teatime" auf, als Name eines Prozesses.


TeaTimer.exe
...
...


(E?)(L?) https://tea-and-scones.de/afternoon-tea/

...
Sandwich mit Gurke und Cream Cheese

Gurken gehören zu den Klassikern der englischen Teatime. Für diese Sandwiches benötigt ihr 200 g Frischkäse, 4-5 Stangen frische und gehackte Minze, 6-8 Scheiben Weißbrot und eine 1/2 Gurke, die in dünne Scheiben geschnitten wird. Ihr vermischt den Frischkäse mit der Minze und bestreicht die Weißbrotscheiben damit. Wer mag, schneidet die Kruste vom Brot ab oder schneidet die Brotscheiben in eine klassische Dreiecksform. Gurkenscheiben auf den Frischkäse legen und zuklappen. (ergibt 12-16 kleine Sandwiches)
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.villeroy-boch.de/dining-lifestyle/unsere-services/wissenswertes/britische-teatime.html

DIE BRITISCHE TEATIME UND IHRE GESCHICHTE

Die "Teatime" ist ein Sinnbild für die englische Genusskultur und auf der ganzen Welt berühmt. Dabei verwenden die Briten den Begriff "Teatime" selbst gar nicht, denn in Großbritannien zelebriert man das Teetrinken zu verschiedenen Tageszeiten: Der "Early Morning Tea" wird noch im Bett genossen, der "Breakfast Tea" zum Frühstück, der "Elevensen" vor dem Mittagessen. Weltweite Berühmtheit hat der "Afternoon Tea" erlangt. Wenn von einer "Teatime" die Rede ist, handelt es sich in aller Regel um diesen traditionellen "Nachmittagstee".

Was ist eine Teatime?

Feiner Tee, köstliches Naschwerk, appetitliche Snacks, edles Porzellan und ein stilvolles Ambiente:

Die britische Teatime ist eine elegante Zwischenmahlzeit, die zusammen mit Gästen beim angeregten Austausch genossen wird.

Serviert wird die Teatime klassischerweise auf einem niedrigen Salontisch.

Doch wie kamen die Briten eigentlich zu ihrer Teekultur?

Ein Blick in die Geschichte offenbart so manche Überraschung – oder hätten Sie gewusst, dass England seine "Teatime" zwei starken Frauen verdankt?

Wann ist die klassische Teatime?

Der typische "Afternoon Tea" findet zwischen drei und fünf Uhr am Nachmittag statt, deshalb wird er auch "Five-o-Clock-Tea" genannt. Die Tradition des "Afternoon Tea" geht ebenfalls auf eine Frau zurück: Lady Bedford, Hofdame von Königin Victoria, gilt als seine Erfinderin.

Lady Bedford fühlte sich am späteren Nachmittag häufig etwas unwohl. Zu ihrer Zeit pflegte man mittags nur ein leichtes Mahl einzunehmen, das Abendessen wurde aber erst nach sieben Uhr abends serviert. Zur Stärkung ließ sich Lady Bedford daher nachmittags eine Tasse Tee und einen kleinen Imbiss bringen. Ihren Gästen servierte sie diese Zwischenmahlzeiten im Salon. Dies stieß auf so viel Gegenliebe, dass Lady Bedfords "Afternoon Tea" bald ein beliebtes Event des britischen Adels wurde.
...


(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britische_Teekultur

Die Britische Teekultur entstand im 17. Jahrhundert und ist über das Vereinigte Königreich hinaus bekannt. Das Vereinigte Königreich lag 2016 mit einem jährlichen Konsum von 4,28 Pfund (1,94 Kilogramm) Tee pro Kopf weltweit auf Platz 3 nach der Türkei und Irland. Das Teetrinken gehört zur typisch britischen Lebensart und ist fester Bestandteil der Trinkkultur der Briten. Vor allem der Nachmittagstee ("tea time") wird oftmals zelebriert und nach bestimmten Regeln serviert. Meist ist die sprichwörtliche Tasse Tee jedoch kein verfeinerter Ausdruck britischer Kultur, sondern einfach ein häufig genossenes Alltagsgetränk, gern auch aus dem Becher.
...
Die Einführung des Afternoon teas wird Anna, 7th Duchess of Bedford (1783–1857), einer Hofdame von Königin Victoria, zugeschrieben.
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.yourdictionary.com/teatime

Teatime definition ...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Teatime
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Teatime" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1780 / 1850 auf.

Erstellt: 2022-05

U

V

W

X

Y

Z