Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Sprachlich relevante Ereignisse im Jahr +1086

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domesdaybook.co.uk
The Domesday Book Online

(E?)(L?) http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/

The Domesday Book was commissioned in December 1085 by William the Conqueror, who invaded England in 1066. The first draft was completed in August 1086 and contained records for 13,418 settlements in the English counties south of the rivers Ribble and Tees (the border with Scotland at the time).

The original Domesday Book has survived over 900 years of English history and is currently housed in a specially made chest at The National Archives in Kew, London. This site has been set up to enable visitors to discover the history of the Domesday Book, to give an insight into life at the time of its compilation, and provide information and links on related topics.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/faqs.html#1

Frequently Asked Questions What is the Domesday Book?

The Domesday Book is a great land survey from 1086, commissioned by William the Conqueror to assess the extent of the land and resources being owned in England at the time, and the extent of the taxes he could raise. The information collected was recorded by hand in two huge books, in the space of around a year. William died before it was fully completed.

Why is it called the 'Domesday' Book?

It was written by an observer of the survey that "there was no single hide nor a yard of land, nor indeed one ox nor one cow nor one pig which was left out". The grand and comprehensive scale on which the Domesday survey took place (see How it was compiled), and the irreversible nature of the information collected led people to compare it to the "Last Judgement", or "Doomsday", described in the Bible, when the deeds of Christians written in the Book of Life were to be placed before God for judgement. This name was not adopted until the late 12th Century.

What information is in the book?

The Domesday Book provides extensive records of landholders, their tenants, the amount of land they owned, how many people occupied the land (villagers, smallholders, free men, slaves, etc.), the amounts of woodland, meadow, animals, fish and ploughs on the land (if there were any) and other resources, any buildings present (churches, castles, mills, salthouses, etc.), and the whole purpose of the survey - the value of the land and its assets, before the Norman Conquest, after it, and at the time of Domesday. Some entries also chronicle disputes over who held land, some mention customary dues that had to be paid to the king, and entries for major towns include records of traders and number of houses.
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Erstellt: 2017-11

Doomsday Book (W3)

Im engl. "Doomsday Book" ist die ursprüngliche Bedeutung von engl. "doom" = dt. "Schicksal", "Untergang", "Vernichtung". Vor dem 16. Jh. traf man engl. "doom" bzw. altengl. "dom" in der Bedeutung dt. "Gesetz", "Urteil ", "Verurteilung" an.

Engl. "doom" (1600) = dt. "Schicksal", "Untergang", "Vernichtung" geht zurück auf altengl. "dom" = dt. "Gesetz", "Urteil", "Verurteilung". Eines der ältesten englischen Wörter engl. "doom" hatte ursprünglich eine neutrale Bedeutung als dt. "Gesetz" (sowohl im Sinne von Gewohnheitsrecht als auch im Sinne einer Gesetzesregelung, Verordnung, Verfügung). Der Bedeutungswandel verlief über dt. "Beurteilung", "Benachteiligung" zu dt. "ausgesprochene Verurteilung" insbesondere dt. "Verurteilung", "Straferlass". Und eine Verurteilung konnte durchaus die Lebensplanung eines Menschen vernichten. Und heute findet man auch die Konnotation dt. "Schicksal", "Geschick", "Los", "katastrophales Schicksal".

Noch weiter zurück gehend wird germ. "*domaz" und ide. "*dhe-" postuliert.

Über ide. "*dhe-" = dt. "setzen", "stellen", "legen", "bereiten", gehört engl. "doom" zu einer grossen Wortfamilie, zu der z.B. auch russ. "duma" = dt. "gewählte Volksvertretung" (wörtlich dt. "Gedanke", zu got. "dom" = dt. "Ruhm", "Urteil") gehört. Als nahe Verwandte findet man altengl. "dombec" = dt. "Gesetzbuch". Als Adjektiv findet man engl. "doomed" = dt. "verloren", "dem Untergang geweiht".

Als Wilhelm der Eroberer im Jahr 1066 nach England kam ließ er erst einmal eine Bestandsaufnahme der englischen Besitzverhältnisse an Boden erstellen. Diese Bestandsaufnahem wurde in einem Werk festgehalten, das den Namen engl. "Doomsday Book" erhielt.

Die Herausgabe des "Doomsday Book" im Jahre 1086, eines Grund- und Steuerkatasters, das Wilhelm erstellen ließ, gilt heute als Geburtsstunde Englands.

Literatur:

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20070512130707/http://www5.bartleby.com/68/79/1979.html

Domesday, doomsday

"Doomsday" was a day in Old English times when judicial decisions were pronounced, and it also became the name Christians gave to the "day of the Last Judgment".

The "Doomsday Book" is the huge survey of landholdings in England done for William the Conqueror in the eleventh century, so named because it was a legal undertaking, and it aimed to be as fair and relentless as "Judgment Day" itself. "Doom" and "doomsday" are pronounced DOOM and DOOMZ-DAI, but the name of William’s famous 1086 survey tome is pronounced either the DOMZ-DAI or DOOMZ-DAI book.


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/D2.html

Doom Book (dom-boc) is the book of dooms or judgments compiled by King Alfred. (See DOMESDAY BOOK.)


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/5194.html

"Domesday Book" consists of two volumes, one a large folio, and the other a quarto, the material of each being vellum. It was formerly kept in the Exchequer, under three different locks and keys, but is now kept in the Record Office. The date of the survey is 1086.

Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Durham are not included in the survey, though parts of Westmoreland and Cumberland are taken.

The value of all estates is given, firstly, as in the time of the Confessor; secondly, when bestowed by the Conqueror; and, thirdly, at the time of the survey. It is also called "The King’s Book", and "The Winchester Roll" because it was kept there. Printed in facsimile in 1783 and 1816.

Stow says the book was so called because it was deposited in a part of Winchester Cathedral called "Domus-dei", and that the word is a contraction of "Domus-dei book"; more likely it is connected with the previous surveys made by the Saxon kings, and called "dom-bocs" ("libri judiciales"), because every case of dispute was decided by an appeal to these registers.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/exploreraltflash/?tag=&page=1

William 1st Silver Penny

Contributed by Anthony

Our family (Sweatman) emanated from the City of Oxford in England where we have two records from the Doomsday Book of families living in 'hovels' or 'holes in the wall'. They were 'Moneyers' and were licensed to produce coin of the realm. Six coins (William I Silver Pennies 1066 - 1087) reside on display in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford that have the name S?ETMAN stamped on the reverse.

We also have one of these silver coins which obviously, is very much treasured !

The 'A' in the name of Sweatman is an option that developed much later on.

The 'W' within the name is represented by a letter (?) that looks very similar to a p but is narrower and the curved part descends at 45° to meet the descending stroke and named (wynn, win or wen) and is descended from a Saxon 'runic' letter.


(E?)(L?) http://www.nndb.com/people/571/000029484/

Connie Willis Author Connie Willis is not well known by name, however her work has earned her numerous Hugo and Nebula awards, more than any other author in the science fiction genre. Her best known novels include "Lincoln's Dreams" (John W. Campbell Memorial Award), "Doomsday Book" (Nebula Award), "To Say Nothing of the Dog" (Hugo), and "Passage" (Locus Award). Considered one of the current masters of the short story format, she has published a vast amount of short fiction, including the award winners "Even the Queen", "Fire Watch", "The Last of the Winnebagos", "A Letter from the Clearys", "Death on the Nile", and "The Winds of Marble Arch", and "At the Rialto". She is a frequent and popular speaker at science fiction conventions.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Doomsday Book

Limericks on "Doomsday Book"


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Doomsday Book

Doomsday Book


(E?)(L?) https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/dogeared/?page=26

Speculative Fiction

July 31, 2006

It goes by any number of rubrics: "Science fiction", "speculative fiction", "fantasy". Whatever you call it, a software developer here at the VT named Robert W. is a huge fan. When he's not busy fine-tuning our visualization technology, he's nose-deep in the genre. We asked Robert to tell us about his favorites:


(E?)(L?) https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/Doomsday%20Book

Definitions of "Doomsday Book": record of a British census and land survey in 1085-1086 ordered by William the Conqueror


(E?)(L?) https://www.welt.de/geschichte/article151349703/Mit-einer-List-eroberten-die-Normannen-England.html
(E?)(L?) https://www.welt.de/geschichte/article151349703/Mit-einer-List-eroberten-die-Normannen-England.html#cs-Big-Ben-and-the-Houses-of-Parliament-B.jpg

Von Jan von Flocken

Veröffentlicht am 23.01.2016



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(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/doomsday-book

Doomsday Book


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Doomsday Book
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Doomsday Book" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1790 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Doomsday Book

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2017-11

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hathitrust.org
Hofmann, Matthias
Die Französierung des Personennamenschatzes im Domesday Book der Gafschaften Hampshire und Sussex

(E?)(L?) https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000152641

Item 100: Die Französierung des Personennamenschatzes im Domesday Book der Gafschaften Hampshire und Sussex ...

by Hofmann, Matthias, 1908-

Published 1934

Language(s): German

Published: Murnau Obb., Buchdruckerei Fürst, 1934.

Physical Description: xv, 169 p., 1 L. 23 cm.

Viewability: Limited (search only) (original from University of Michigan)


Erstellt: 2017-11

hathitrust.org
Turner, J. Horsfall
Yorkshire place names, as recorded in the Yorkshire Domesday book, 1086

(E?)(L?) https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hx6dc7;view=1up;seq=35

Yorkshire place names, as recorded in the Yorkshire Domesday book, 1086

Comprising all the references (nearly five thousand,) to places in the three ridings and North Lancashire .. with their modern names & suggested etymologies; the chief lords and tenants; and twenty-two illustrations. By J. Horsfall Turner.

by Turner, J. Horsfall 1845 - Published 1909


Erstellt: 2017-11

historyofinformation.com
The Domesday Book, Recording the First English Census

(E?)(L?) http://www.historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?id=262

The Domesday Book, Recording the First English Census

December 1085 – August 1086

The Domesday Book.

In 1085 William I, the first Norman King of England (better known as "William the Conqueror", and less well known as "William the Bastard"), commissioned the "Domesday Book", which recorded the first English census. (The name is pronounced like "doomsday".)

The first draft of the "Domesday Book" was completed in August 1086 and contained records for 13,418 settlements in the English counties south of the rivers Ribble and Tees (the border with Scotland at the time). William commissioned the book to assess the extent of the land owned in England, and the extent of the taxes he could raise. The information collected was recorded in two huge books in around one year, but William died in 1087 before the "Domeday Book" was completed. It is preserved in The National Archives of Britain in Richmond, Greater London.

A page of the Domesday Book on Warwickshire.

The work was called the "Domesday Book" because:

"It was written by an observer of the survey that 'there was no single hide nor a yard of land, nor indeed one ox nor one cow nor one pig which was left out.' The grand and comprehensive scale on which the Domesday survey took place, and the irreversible nature of the information collected led people to compare it to the Last Judgement, or "Doomsday", described in the Bible, when the deeds of Christians written in the Book of Life were to be placed before God for judgment. This name was not adopted until the late 12th Century."

Filed under: Archives, Economics , Manuscripts & Manuscript Copying, Statistics / Demography, Survival of Information / Philology


Erstellt: 2017-11

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nationalarchives.gov.uk
Domesday Book

(E?)(L?) http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/domesday/

Domesday: Britain's finest treasure

Domesday is Britain’s earliest public record. It contains the results of a huge survey of land and landholding commissioned by William I in 1085. Domesday is by the far the most complete record of pre-industrial society to survive anywhere in the world and provides a unique window on the medieval world.

Discover Domesday - Find out why and how Domesday was created, and how its legacy has been preserved. World of Domesday - Discover what life was like in 11th century England, from how society was ordered to what people ate. Research guide - Learn how to access and understand the information within Domesday Book.

For teachers and students - Explore our online resource about Domesday, with tasks and questions you can use in the classroom.


(E?)(L?) http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/domesday/discover-domesday/

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Why is it called "Domesday"?

The word "Domesday" does not appear in the book itself. A book written about the Exchequer in c.1176 (the Dialogus de Sacarrio) states that the book was called "Domesday" as a metaphor for "the day of judgement", because its decisions, like those of the last judgement, were unalterable. For many centuries "Domesday" was regarded as the authoritative register of ancient landholding and was used mainly for that purpose. It was called "Domesday" by 1180. In the medieval period "Domesday" was also known as the "Winchester Roll" or "King’s Roll", and sometimes as the "Book of the Treasury".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/focuson/domesday/default.htm

Domesday Book is one of the most famous historical records held by The National Archives. It was written over nine hundred years ago under the orders of King William the Conqueror. William wanted to know how much his kingdom was worth and how much taxation he could command. The result is a detailed survey of the land held by the king and his people.

Follow the links to discover the story behind Domesday Book, find out how it was made and take a closer look. Try some of our activities and watch our video clips.


(E?)(L?) http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/domesday/glossary/default.htm

Glossary


Erstellt: 2017-11

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
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